Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a crontab running every hour. The user running it has environment variabless in the .bash_profile that work when the user runs the job from the terminal, however, obviously these don't get picked up by crontab when it runs.

I've tried setting them in .profile and .bashrc but they still don't seem to get picked up. Does anyone know where I can put environment vars that crontab can pick up?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Have 'cron' run a shell script that sets the environment before running the command.

Always.

#   @(#)$Id: crontab,v 4.2 2007/09/17 02:41:00 jleffler Exp $
#   Crontab file for Home Directory for Jonathan Leffler (JL)
#-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
#Min     Hour    Day     Month   Weekday Command
#-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
0        *       *       *       *       /usr/bin/ksh /work1/jleffler/bin/Cron/hourly
1        1       *       *       *       /usr/bin/ksh /work1/jleffler/bin/Cron/daily
23       1       *       *       1-5     /usr/bin/ksh /work1/jleffler/bin/Cron/weekday
2        3       *       *       0       /usr/bin/ksh /work1/jleffler/bin/Cron/weekly
21       3       1       *       *       /usr/bin/ksh /work1/jleffler/bin/Cron/monthly

The scripts in ~/bin/Cron are all links to a single script, 'runcron', which looks like:

:       "$Id: runcron.sh,v 2.1 2001/02/27 00:53:22 jleffler Exp $"
#
#       Commands to be performed by Cron (no debugging options)

#       Set environment -- not done by cron (usually switches HOME)
. $HOME/.cronfile

base=`basename $0`
cmd=${REAL_HOME:-/real/home}/bin/$base

if [ ! -x $cmd ]
then cmd=${HOME}/bin/$base
fi

exec $cmd ${@:+"$@"}

(Written using an older coding standard - nowadays, I'd use a shebang '#!' at the start.)

The '~/.cronfile' is a variation on my profile for use by cron - rigorously non-interactive and no echoing for the sake of being noisy. You could arrange to execute the .profile and so on instead. (The REAL_HOME stuff is an artefact of my environment - you can pretend it is the same as $HOME.)

So, this code reads the appropriate environment and then executes the non-Cron version of the command from my home directory. So, for example, my 'weekday' command looks like:

:       "@(#)$Id: weekday.sh,v 1.10 2007/09/17 02:42:03 jleffler Exp $"
#
#       Commands to be done each weekday

# Update ICSCOPE
n.updics

The 'daily' command is simpler:

:       "@(#)$Id: daily.sh,v 1.5 1997/06/02 22:04:21 johnl Exp $"
#
#       Commands to be done daily

# Nothing -- most things are done on weekdays only

exit 0
share|improve this answer
    
ok that's what I've been doing but I thought there may be an alternative way... thanks, at least I was on the right track. :) –  James Feb 9 '10 at 17:09

You can define environment variables in the crontab itself when running crontab -e from the command line.

LANG=nb_NO.UTF-8
LC_ALL=nb_NO.UTF-8
# m h  dom mon dow   command

* * * * * sleep 5s && echo "yo"

This feature is only available to certain implementations of cron. Ubuntu and Debian currently use vixie-cron which allows these to be declared in the crontab file (also GNU mcron).

Archlinux and RedHat use cronie which does not allow environment variables to be declared and will throw syntax errors in the cron.log. Workaround can be done per-entry:

# m h  dom mon dow   command
* * * * * export LC_ALL=nb_NO.UTF-8; sleep 5s && echo "yo"
share|improve this answer
11  
Note that you can't use variable substitution as in shell, so a declaration like PATH=/usr/local/bin:$PATH is interpreted literally. –  Zac Jul 5 '13 at 10:13

I got one more solution for this problem:

0 5 * * * . $HOME/.profile; /path/to/command/to/run

In this case it will pick all the environment variable defined in your $HOME/.profile file.

Of course $HOME is also not set, you have to replace it with the full path of your $HOME.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked for me after struggling a lot to find the answer, thanks! –  vladimir montealegre Dec 27 '12 at 21:30
    
this wasn't working for me until I realized I had left out that period preceding $HOME. What, exactly, does that period do? –  flymike Mar 5 '13 at 16:48
1  
The period is equivalent to the "source" command: tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/special-chars.html#DOTREF –  Jeff Wehrwein Mar 8 '13 at 21:55
    
This is NOT working for me –  Peter Lee Mar 21 '13 at 21:11
    
@PeterLee does anything mentioned worked for you? I wrote this as the above mentioned solutions were not effective for me. If above mentioned solution does not work, I will have to do some research to find the reason. ;-) –  Vishal Mar 22 '13 at 5:48

Expanding on @carestad example, which I find easier, is to run the script with cron and have the environment in the script.

In crontab -e file:

SHELL=/bin/bash

*/1 * * * * $HOME/cron_job.sh

In cron_job.sh file:

#!/bin/bash
source $HOME/.bash_profile
some_other_cmd

Any command after the source of .bash_profile will have your environment as if you logged in.

share|improve this answer

Expanding on @Robert Brisita has just expand , also if you don't want to set up all the variables of the profile in the script, you can select the variables to export on the top of the script

In crontab -e file:

SHELL=/bin/bash

*/1 * * * * /Path/to/script/script.sh

In script.sh

#!/bin/bash
export JAVA_HOME=/path/to/jdk

some-other-command
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.