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I'm using the 'using' declaration in C++ to add std::string and std::vector to the local namespace (to save typing unnecessary 'std::'s).

using std::string;
using std::vector;

class Foo { /*...*/ };

What is the scope on this declaration? If I do this in a header, will it inject these 'using' declarations into every cpp file that includes the header?

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10  
Just in case it's not clear from the other answers here: - Do not put a using declaration (or using directive) at file scope in an include file/header! That will cause headaches for users of the header. –  Michael Burr Oct 21 '08 at 19:07

7 Answers 7

up vote 30 down vote accepted

When you #include a header file in C++, it places the whole contents of the header file into the spot that you included it in the source file. So including a file that has a using declaration has the exact same effect of placing the using declaration at the top of each file that includes that header file.

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21  
... which is generally a bad thing. –  Catskul Feb 16 '11 at 5:25
6  
But if you put the using declaration inside a namespace it's limited to the scope of that namespace, so is generally OK (with the usual caveats on your particular needs and style). –  Zero Dec 4 '12 at 23:09
    
...but if you do put using inside a namespace, make sure you aren't doing it to try to get around something that normally is a bad idea, like you can't encase class methods declared outside the namespace Y inside the other namespace X, just so you can locally use the namespace X. Thats why we have use namespace :: resolvers in the first place. If its that big of a problem of typing, either a macro (which can easily lead to code smells) or better yet, isolate it into it's own source .cpp where you will use the namespace there only. –  osirisgothra Jan 17 at 17:29

In the case cited, the file ("translation unit"), which means yes, every file that includes it.

You can also put the using statement inside the class, in which case, it's in effect just for that class.

Generally, if you need to specify a namespace in a header, it's often best to just fully-qualify every identifier necessary.

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Note that the using declaration in a class does not behave in the same way as outside a class - eg you can't use it bring cout instead of std::cout into the scope of the class. –  Zero Dec 4 '12 at 23:07

That is correct. The scope is the module that uses the using declaration. If any header files that a module includes have using declarations, the scope of those declarations will be that module, as well as any other modules that include the same headers.

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There's nothing special about header files that would keep the using declaration out. It's a simple text substitution before the compilation even starts.

You can limit a using declaration to a scope:

void myFunction()
{
   using namespace std; // only applies to the function's scope
   vector<int> myVector;
}
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The scope is whatever scope the using declaration is in.

If this is global scope, then it will be at global scope. If it is in global scope of a header file, then it will be in the global scope of every source file that includes the header.

So, the general advice is to avoid using declarations in global scope of header files.

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That's not strong enough. Replace avoid with Don't –  Loki Astari Oct 21 '08 at 23:27
1  
BUt avoid is stronger than don't. "Avoid hitting the other cars" –  bobobobo Aug 8 '09 at 3:00

The scope of the using statement depends on where it is located in the code:

  • Placed at the top of a file, it has scope throughout that file.
  • If this is a header file, it will have scope in all files that include that header. In general, this is "not a good idea" as it can have unexpected side effects
  • Otherwise the using statement has scope within the block that contains it from the point it occurs to the end of the block. If it is placed within a method, it will have scope within that method. If it is placed within a class definition it will have scope within that class.
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2  
I thought it wasn't possible of adding a using statement within class scope... ? I had the same question as the OP because of that as I wanted to avoid typing std:: all over the place. I got classes that uses a lot of vectors with smart pointers and the five character std:: prefix adds a lot of line length - which I find reads worse. So I was wondering if a using directive within the namespace containing the class was ok? (Even if within a header.) –  thomthom Dec 15 '13 at 9:37

There are a few comments that are rather unqualified when they say "Don't". That is too stern, but you have to understand when it is OK.

Writing using std::string is never OK. Writing using ImplementationDetail::Foo in your own header, when that header declares ImplementationDetail::Foo can be OK, moreso if the using declaration happens in your namespace. E.g.

namespace MyNS {
    namespace ImplementationDetail {
        int Foo;
    }
    using ImplementationDetail::Foo;
}
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1  
The user of the header can then write MyNS::Foo –  Peter Remmers Feb 28 '12 at 13:03
    
A better example is using boost::posix_time::ptime. Sure the user could write MyNS::ptime but that's not the end of the world, and might be offset by the convenience of being able to have functions like MyFunction(ptime a, ptime b). –  Zero Dec 4 '12 at 23:04
    
Why is using std::string never ok? Even in your own namespace to save a lot of std:: prefixes? –  thomthom Dec 15 '13 at 9:39

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