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I have a problem with matching optional pattern groups in regex. Metacharacters * and + are greedy, so I thought metacharacter ? would also be greedy, but it doesn't seem to function like I thought.

Theoretically I assumed that if we chose to make a pattern group optional, if the pattern group is found in the string, it will be returned in the match results, if it isn't found we will still get overall match results, but with this match missing in the results.

What actually happens is if my pattern is matched in the string, it isnt included in the match results, regex seems like it notices that the pattern group is optional and just doesn't bother to even attempt to match it.

If we set up a test and change this optional pattern group to non-optional, regex will include it in the match results, but this is only practical for the test because sometimes this pattern wont be available in the string.

The reason why I need the match included in the results, is because I need the match results for analyzing at a later date.

Encase I have not described this scenario very well, I have setup a very simple example which follows, In PHP.

$string = 'This is a test, Stackoverflow. 2014 Cecili0n';

if(preg_match_all("~(This).*?(Stackoverflow)?~i",$string,$match))
    print_r($match);

Results

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => This
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => This
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [0] => 
        )
)

(Stackoverflow)? is the optional pattern, if we run the above code, even though this pattern is available in the string, it will not be returned in the match results.

If we make this pattern group mandatory it will be returned in the results, like in the following.

if(preg_match_all("~(This).*?(Stackoverflow)~i",$string,$match))
    print_r($match);

Results

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => This
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => This
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [0] => Stackoverflow
        )
)

How can I achieve this? It is important for me to get accurate data on how the match was found.

Thanks for any thoughts on the matter.

share|improve this question
    
Wow, very good question. I am completely baffled and would like to also know what is actually happening here. Note: this is not a PHP-specific problem but instead a generic RegEx problem. –  tenub Mar 10 at 14:25
    
@tenub I have had this problem in the past and spent hours trying many different alternatives, such as deeper nested subgroups, specifying minimum interval groups and so on, in the end I believe I just left it out, now the problem returns but this time I cant leave it. –  cecilli0n Mar 10 at 14:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What happens here

This might be surprising, but it is actually expected behavior. Let's break down the regex and translate it to human-readable terms:

(This)               Match "This" literally
.*?                  Match any character **as few times as possible**,
                     while still allowing the rest of the expression to match
(Stackoverflow)?     Match "Stackoverflow" literally **if possible**

So what happens is:

  • The regex engine matches "This".
  • It then has to consider how many characters the *? quantifier should match.
  • Let's assume we match zero characters. Does this allow the rest of the expression to match? In other words, does (Stackoverflow)? match " is a test, Stackoverflow. 2014 Cecili0n"?
  • The subpattern is optional, so it does! Therefore, .*? matches zero characters.
  • What does the final subpattern (Stackoverflow)? match? Obviously nothing at the position where the match is attempted.

End result: both quantified subpatterns match the empty string.

How to get the expected result

If making everything optional won't work, how do you optionally match "Stackoverflow"? By explicitly spelling out the acceptable options to the regex engine:

~(This)(.*?(Stackoverflow)|.*?)~i

This instructs the engine to either match as much as it can followed by the literal "Stackoverflow", or otherwise match as much as it can. By listing the "Stackoverflow included" option first you are assured that if it does exist in the text it will be matched.

Obviously the .*? option does not make too much sense in this example, but I am leaving it as it is because I wanted to describe a "mechanical" transformation that will work regardless of the actual regular expression.

Note that to maintain full equivalence with the original regex the extra group introduced for structural purposes has to be made non-capturing:

~(This)(?:.*?(Stackoverflow)|.*)~i

See it in action.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for awesome answer –  Kizer Mar 10 at 14:59
    
@Jon, Thanks I am still studying your answer, however in your third bullet point in the opening paragraph you said about me using ".*?", and that because its a lazy version, zero match maybe accepted, however even when I make this pattern greedy with ".*", it is the exact same result with a missing group. I would have thought that a greedy match should stumble upon (Stackoverflow)?, as it is told to match as much as possible, but it still doesn't, –  cecilli0n Mar 10 at 16:13
1  
@cecilli0n: That's easier to explain now. .* works the opposite way: it starts by assuming it matches everything up to the end of the string. Then, since the whole regex must match, can you match (Stackoverflow)? at the end of the string? Sure you can, it's optional. So greedy .* matches everything and the optional subpattern is again left empty-handed. –  Jon Mar 10 at 16:23

I have experimented with this, but can't seem to be able to break it. Meanwhile, one viable option will be to have two test, as shown in the example below

$string = 'This is a test, Stackoverflow. 2014 Cecili0n';
$pattern1 = "~(This).*?(Stackoverflow)~i";
$pattern2 = "~(This).*?~i";

if(preg_match_all($pattern1,$string,$match)) {
    print_r($match);
} elseif(preg_match_all($pattern2,$string,$match)) {
    print_r($match);
}

I will update the answer when I find something better.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't really address the question. –  Ed Cottrell Mar 10 at 15:15
    
@kizer in the past I believe I have resorted to solutions like this, it does work but it becomes a bad fix when you have alot of regex, updating one group means everything must be changed. –  cecilli0n Mar 10 at 22:31
    
@Jon's answer works perfectly. –  Kizer Mar 11 at 12:42

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