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Given the following inputs: (note: this is not a linked list, it's all one string output from a web app that I don't have control over)

DAVSCAF1WD6-11 ==> MOTENVF1WD6-11 
MOTENVF1WD6-11 ==> WNDVUTF1WD4-11 
TPKAKSF1WD6-11 ==> KSCYMOF1WD6-11
WNDVUTF1WD3-11 ==> WGTNUTF1WD2-11
DNVRCOF1WD7-11 ==> BELTKSF1WD3-11 
SNFCCAF1WD6-16 ==> DAVSCAF1WD5-16
WGTNUTF1WD2-11 ==> DTSRCOF1WD3-11
DTSRCOF1WD3-11 ==> DNVRCOF1WD6-11 
BELTKSF1WD3-11 ==> TPKAKSF1WD6-11

I need to produce the following results:

SNFCCAF1WD6-16 ==> DAVSCAF1WD5-16 
DAVSCAF1WD6-11 ==> MOTENVF1WD6-11 
MOTENVF1WD6-11 ==> WNDVUTF1WD4-11 
WNDVUTF1WD3-11 ==> WGTNUTF1WD2-11 
WGTNUTF1WD2-11 ==> DTSRCOF1WD3-11
DTSRCOF1WD3-11 ==> DNVRCOF1WD6-11 
DNVRCOF1WD7-11 ==> BELTKSF1WD3-11 
BELTKSF1WD3-11 ==> TPKAKSF1WD6-11 
TPKAKSF1WD6-11 ==> KSCYMOF1WD6-11

This is a list where each tail points to the head of the next item in line (ex. SNFCCAF ==> DAVSCAF ==> DAVSCAF ==> MOTENVF ==> MOTENVF ==> WNDVUTF ==> etc. ) Only the leading alpha charaters are significant in this case.

How can I accomplish this as elegantly as possible? The language this is being implemented in is Java.

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1  
Is this homework? –  Oded Feb 9 '10 at 16:02
    
No it is not, this real world. I can brute force it with less than eleagant code, but I'm curious if there is a more elegant solution. –  Bill Feb 9 '10 at 16:10
    
Do you mean to say you need a method to sort a single linked list? –  MAK Feb 9 '10 at 16:34
    
My god man, would it be hard to use values like "A", "B", "C" in your example instead of "SNFCCAF1WD6-16"? That stuff is making it really hard for me to understand your question. -- and at this point, I really don't understand the question! When you say inputs, do you mean you're reading this from a text file? Or you have a linked list structure, or what? –  Kevin Bourrillion Feb 9 '10 at 23:13
    
@kevin The above are the results of a screen scrape as you see it (with other condidential information stripped out of the strings). The problem is that the offending application sometimes spits the output out of order. Trust me, that is the data I deal with. –  Bill Feb 9 '10 at 23:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you aren't going to have duplicates, then maybe the easiest way to do this is with a Map. Put each head-tail pair in as the key and value. Then you can traverse the list with Map.get() by using the previous tail as the next head.

On the other hand, you're then stuck with the problem of finding the first item in the list: That would be a head which never appears as a tail. For that, I guess you could setwise subtract values() from keySet(). Assuming that you really have a chain, the result will be the singleton set containing the first element in the list.

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2  
+1 Good answer. Re. the head of the list, assuming you need to know this you could just store a reference to it outside the Map and then perhaps encapsulate the Map and "head" behind an Iterable impl. –  Adamski Feb 9 '10 at 16:43
    
This was somewhat the approach I was taking. It's good to know I'm not off track. There should be a complete chain, but as this is really a screen scrape from a quirky application, you never know. I'll just have to throw an exception in that case, as that would be a big problem in the network. There is also more junk in the string that I had to strip from the example for confidentiality reason. A reference outside the map seems to be the best approach. Thanks. –  Bill Feb 9 '10 at 17:31

I am late to this but FWIW I have used the Google Collections for a similar problem where I have a list that contains records that have a variable number of lines. To manage it more easily I decided to create head / tail style functions like this:

public class MyListUtils {

    public static <T> List<T> getHeadSubList(List<T> list, Predicate<T> predicate) {
        int firstItem = indexOf(list, predicate);

        if (firstItem < 0)
            return new ArrayList<T>(); // return empty list if none found

        if (firstItem == list.size() - 1)   // It's the last element of the list
            return list.subList(firstItem, list.size());

        List<T> rest = list.subList(firstItem + 1, list.size());
        int nextItem = indexOf(rest, predicate);

        if (nextItem < 0)
            return list;
        else
            return list.subList(firstItem, nextItem + 1);
    }

    public static <T> List<T> getTailSubList(List<T> list, Predicate<T> predicate) {
        List<T> head = getHeadSubList(list, predicate);

        if (head.isEmpty() || head.size() == list.size())
            return new ArrayList<T>(); // return empty list if none found

        return list.subList(head.size(), list.size());
    }
}
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