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I would like to create an application that serves web pages internally and can be run in multiple instances on the same machine. To do so, I would like to create an HttpListener that listens on a port that is:

  1. Randomly selected
  2. Currently unused

Essentially, what I would like is something like:

mListener = new HttpListener();
mListener.Prefixes.Add("http://*:0/");
mListener.Start();
selectedPort = mListener.Port;

How can I accomplish this?

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TcpListener will find a random un-used port to listen on if you bind to port 0.

public static int GetRandomUnusedPort()
{
    var listener = new TcpListener(IPAddress.Any, 0);
    listener.Start();
    var port = ((IPEndPoint)listener.LocalEndpoint).Port;
    listener.Stop();
    return port;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Does this take into account firewalls, if the port is blocked? – Clever Human May 31 '12 at 14:33
2  
No, there is no way for it to know that. – Richard Dingwall Jun 10 '12 at 11:51
3  
This doesn't answer the question about the HttpListener class. – jnm2 Jun 29 '13 at 17:29
    
@jnm2 This answer provides a way to find a random unused port. Creating the HttpListener on that port is then trivial. – piedar Feb 27 '15 at 23:27
1  
I would say fair enough except for the race condition between releasing the port at the end of your method and starting the HttpListener. – jnm2 Feb 27 '15 at 23:55

How about something like this:

    static List<int> usedPorts = new List<int>();
    static Random r = new Random();

    public HttpListener CreateNewListener()
    {
        HttpListener mListener;
        int newPort = -1;
        while (true)
        {
            mListener = new HttpListener();
            newPort = r.Next(49152, 65535); // IANA suggests the range 49152 to 65535 for dynamic or private ports.
            if (usedPorts.Contains(newPort))
            {
                continue;
            }
            mListener.Prefixes.Add(string.Format("http://*:{0}/", newPort));
            try
            {
                mListener.Start();
            }
            catch
            {
                continue;
            }
            usedPorts.Add(newPort);
            break;
        }

        return mListener;
    }

I'm not sure how you would find all of the ports that are in use on that machine, but you should get an exception if you try to listen on a port that is already being used, in which case the method will simply pick another port.

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1  
You may want to consider using the MinPort/MaxPort constants instead, MSDN link – Joseph Lennox May 13 '14 at 16:02

I do not believe this is possible. The documentation for UriBuilder.Port states, "If a port is not specified as part of the URI, ... the default port value for the protocol scheme will be used to connect to the host.".

See https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.uribuilder.port(v=vs.110).aspx

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