Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I'm trying to decide how to set up my functions in the prototype for my main library.

Should I use:

Library.prototype.funcA = function () {.....};
Library.prototype.fucnB = function () {.....};
etc..

or

Library.prototype = {
    funcA: function () {.....},
    funcB: function () {.....},
    etc..
};

So basically the first choice adds all my functions to the prototype. The second option replaces the prototype with an object containing all my functions. Does it matter?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Felix Kling, Ian, Vache, Bergi, Blazemonger Mar 10 at 18:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
var foo = new Library(); Library.prototype = {bar: function(){ alert(1); }}; foo.bar(); –  Felix Kling Mar 10 at 18:12
2  
If you go with the second approach, don't forget to add contructor back: Library.prototype = {.... , constructor: Library};. It's not necessary, but it would be strange if it wasn't correctly set. –  Felix Kling Mar 10 at 18:17
    
…and of Defining a Javascript prototype –  Bergi Mar 10 at 18:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would go with the first option.

You don't want to completely replace the prototype, as you never know what has been added from another project.

If it's something completely self-contained that only you are working on, the second is an ok option. But it is still not a good habit to get into so you don't inadvertently blow away some functionality something else is counting on.

share|improve this answer
1  
Strangely I feel this is the best answer from all the given answers, especially the prototype overwriting part. –  holodoc Mar 10 at 18:11
    
After reading all the answers and references to other posts, I agree this is the best answer. No point in breaking the prototype chain or deleting everything from the prototype just to add my functions. I can see either one works, but I think keeping the original prototype and adding to it is more elegant. Thank you. –  ChrisGciso Mar 10 at 18:29

In this case, no, it doesn't matter. It's your object, and you're not attempting to inherit from anything, so overwriting the prototype (as opposed to appending to it) doesn't matter.

In the general case, yes, it might matter a lot. You're clobbering whatever existing prototypal methods were available to the object. You shouldn't do that unless you're very sure that your code owns the object in question. Conversely, appending methods to the prototype requires thought as well; other objects may share a prototype with the object whose prototype you're modifying.

share|improve this answer
1  
The OP already knows that .prototype = overwrites the existing prototype. See question. –  Chris Mar 10 at 18:15

It does matter. You have to note that the prototype is an object. So your statement "The second option replaces the prototype with an object containing all my functions." is false. It just reset the prototype object.

So using :

Library.prototype = {
    funcA: function () {.....},
    funcB: function () {.....},
    etc..
};

Is faster, but you delete every prototype function you had before that assignment while :

Library.prototype.funcA

is adding a properties.

So, if you have to add a property (not erase one) use :

Library.prototype.funcA

Else, assign an object.

share|improve this answer
    
Please, tell me what is wrong in this answer? –  Karl-André Gagnon Mar 10 at 18:11
    
Someone is on a downvote spree. –  Felix Kling Mar 10 at 18:13
1  
You guys change your posts so quickly that its impossible to keep up with them :) +1 since the balance in the Force is important. –  holodoc Mar 10 at 18:17

If Library has prototypes properties/methods that you don't want to lose you would want to go with adding them via augmenting the already present prototype. Otherwise it's really up to personal preference. I like the second method because it looks cleaner, but I have used both in my code.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.