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Is there any differences between those two class declarations

1:

class MyClass <T extends Number & Comparable>

2:

class MyClass <T extends Number & Comparable<T>>

I think that there are differences. But I cannot find an example which would show differences because I don't understand it exact.

Can you show me this example?

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marked as duplicate by Paul Bellora, Bhesh Gurung, blubb, Jonesy, Ernesto Campohermoso Mar 10 '14 at 19:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Your first snippet uses a raw type, which you shouldn't use. –  arshajii Mar 10 '14 at 18:32
    
@Paul Bellorano, I read this topic. I have concrete question! –  gstackoverflow Mar 10 '14 at 18:33
    
I suggest you re-read it then. It addresses the question exactly. –  Paul Bellora Mar 10 '14 at 18:35
    
I don't accept with you –  gstackoverflow Mar 10 '14 at 18:36
1  
You should go through the tutorial on Java Generics, get more familiar with the basics and the terms. And then you will probably agree with him too. –  Bhesh Gurung Mar 10 '14 at 18:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is a difference. The first one is using raw types, and thus, is less type-safe. For example:

This works, but should not work

class MyClass<T extends Number & Comparable>
{
    void use(T t)
    {
        String s = null;
        t.compareTo(s); // Works, but will cause a runtime error
    }
}

Whereas this does not work (because it should not work)

class MyClass<T extends Number & Comparable<T>>
{
    void use(T t)
    {
        String s = null;
        t.compareTo(s); // Compile-time error
    }
}

EDIT: Full code, as requested:

class MyClass<T extends Number & Comparable>
{
    void use(T t)
    {
        String s = "Laziness";
        t.compareTo(s); // Works, but will cause a runtime error
    }
}


public class MyClassTest
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        MyClass<Integer> m = new MyClass<Integer>();
        Integer integer = new Integer(42);
        m.use(integer);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works, but should not work excellent phrase –  gstackoverflow Mar 10 '14 at 18:35
    
// Works, but will cause a runtime error can you show full code? –  gstackoverflow Mar 10 '14 at 18:37
    
@gstackoverflow Create an instance of first MyClass, and invoke its use() method, passing an appropriate argument. This much you can do I think. –  Rohit Jain Mar 10 '14 at 18:39
    
@gstackoverflow Added an example –  Marco13 Mar 10 '14 at 18:44
    
@Marco13, excellent –  gstackoverflow Mar 10 '14 at 18:48

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