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I am trying to populate a combobox with my database. I am using MVC4 and the Entity Framework. Currently with the way my code sits, the combobox is filled with Nova.Models.Clients. I want the actual company name to be filled in.

Here is my model:

public class Clients
{
    [Key]
    public int ClientId { get; set; }
    public string CompanyName { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string Phone { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public string Address { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string State { get; set; }
    public string Zip { get; set; }
    public ICollection<Estimates> Estimates { get; set; }
    public ICollection<Contracts> Contracts { get; set; }
}

Here is my controller:

public ActionResult EditClients()
    {
        return View();
    }

Here is my View:

@using Nova.Models
@model Nova.Models.Clients
@{
    var context = new NovaDb();
    var clients = context.Clients.OrderBy((x => x.CompanyName));
}

div class="control-group">
   @Html.LabelFor(x => x.CompanyName, new { @class = "control-label" })
   <div class="controls">
       @Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.CompanyName, new SelectList(clients), new { @class = "input-xlarge" })
  </div>
</div>

With this being my first real MVC project, I haven't run across this before. After speaking with my buddy I was a bit confused. I gathered I should put my data access in the controller and not the view, but regardless, it should still work.

Any help would be appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

I would recommend using a separate view model (not the same as your domain model, and not the same as your Entity Framework poco object). This creates a separation of concerns. That said, you can have the following on your view model:

public class ClientViewModel
{
    public int ClientId { get; set; }
    public string CompanyName { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<string> CompanyNames { get; set; }
    // Any other properties here, only include those needed by the view
}

Your controller would populate the list of possible company names into the CompanyNames property on the view model (along with copying the other needed view model properties from your domain model to your view model), and this list will be used as the possible values for the dropdown. The CompanyName property will be used to store the selected value.

And for your dropdown in your view:

@Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.CompanyName, 
                      new SelectList(Model.CompanyNames), 
                      new { @class = "input-xlarge" });

Like you said, make sure your data access is in your controller (if not a separate service layer).

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I created the model, updated the database, and put this in my controller: public ActionResult EditClients() { var model = from r in _db.ClientViewModels select r.CompanyNames; return View(model); } The view has an error that state the IEnumerable is not assignable to Nova.Models.Client –  C.Coggins Mar 10 at 20:07
    
Yes, your view above has Client as the model type, not an IEnumerable of CompanyName. Pass in a Client as the model instead. –  mayabelle Mar 10 at 21:40

try passing Select List in ViewBag

    public ActionResult EditClients()
    {
        var context = new NovaDb();
        ViewBag.ClientList = (from c in context.Clients
                             select new SelectListItem() 
                             {
                               Text=c.CompanyName,
                               Value=c.ClientId
                             }).ToList();
            return View();
        }

In View write

@Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.CompanyName,(List<SelectListItem>)ViewBag.ClientList,new { @class = "input-xlarge" });
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