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Why isn't the observer_ptr zeroed after a move operation?

It is correctly set to nullptr in its default construction, and that does make sense (and prevents pointing to garbage).

And, accordingly, it should be zeroed when std::move()'d from, just like std::string, std::vector, etc.

This would make it a good candidate in several contexts where raw pointers make sense, as well as automatic generation of move operations on classes with raw pointer data members, like in this case.


EDIT

As @JonathanWakely pointed out in the comments (and that is related to the aforementioned question):

if observer_ptr was null after a move it can be used to implement the Rule of Zero for types that have a pointer member. It's a very useful feature.

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2  
Why should it be zeroed? It isn't supposed to own the thing it points to. –  juanchopanza Mar 10 at 20:46
3  
It costs more to zero it than to not do so, and you shouldn't be relying on a moved-from value anyway. –  Alan Stokes Mar 10 at 20:49
3  
Wow, observer_ptr looks like the most ridiculous proposal I've seen. –  Mehrdad Mar 10 at 21:04
2  
As I just commented on your other question you are mistaken about std::string and std::vector. There is no guarantee that string or vector is empty after a move. They are left in a valid but unspecified state. Certain types such as unique_ptr, shared_ptr, unique_lock and future provide a stronger guarantee of being in a known state after a move, containers do not guarantee that. –  Jonathan Wakely Mar 10 at 21:38
2  
@juanchopanza, its current use is to be explicit that you're passing a non-owning pointer, which is useful because it's not clear what void f(X*) intends to do with the pointer (will it take ownership?) That's useful. I just think it would be more useful if it also had one additional property and was null-after-move, otherwise I need another dumb smart pointer which is exactly the same except for being null-after-move. –  Jonathan Wakely Mar 10 at 21:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It seems like many people miss the point and the utility of this idea at first.

Consider:

template<typename Mutex>
class unique_lock
{
  Mutex* pm;

public:
  unique_lock() : pm() { }

  unique_lock(Mutex& m) : pm(&m) { }

  ~unique_lock() { if (pm) pm->unlock(); }

  unique_lock(unique_lock&& ul) : pm(ul.pm) { ul.pm = nullptr; }

  unique_lock& operator=(unique_lock&& ul)
  {
    unique_lock(std::move(ul)).swap(*this);
    return *this;
  }

  void swap(unique_lock& ul) { std::swap(pm, ul.pm); }
};

With a "dumb" smart pointer that is null-on-default-construction and null-after-move you can default three of the special member functions, so it becomes:

template<typename Mutex>
class unique_lock
{
  tidy_ptr<Mutex> pm;

public:
  unique_lock() = default;                            // 1

  unique_lock(Mutex& m) : pm(&m) { }

  ~unique_lock() { if (pm) pm->unlock(); }

  unique_lock(unique_lock&& ul) = default;            // 2

  unique_lock& operator=(unique_lock&& ul) = default; // 3

  void swap(unique_lock& ul) { std::swap(pm, ul.pm); }
};

That's why it's useful to have a dumb, non-owning smart pointer that is null-after-move, like tidy_ptr

But observer_ptr is only null-on-default-construction, so if it is standardized it will be useful for declaring a function to take a non-owning pointer, but it won't be useful for classes like the one above, so I'll still need another non-owning dumb pointer type. Having two non-owning dumb smart pointer types seems almost worse than having none!

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I marked this as "answer". It seems that the current proposal of observer_ptr didn't consider the useful aspects you pointed out here. I can't find any valid rationale for current observer_ptr proposal so far. –  Mr.C64 Mar 10 at 22:08
    
The proposal describes the rationale. –  Jonathan Wakely Mar 10 at 22:16

So, move constructors are designed to make copy constructors cheaper in certain cases.

Let's write out what we'd expect these constructors and destructors to be: (This is a bit of a simplification, but that's fine for this example).

observer_ptr() {
    this->ptr == nullptr;
}

observer_ptr(T *obj) {
    this->ptr = obj;
}

observer_ptr(observer_ptr<T> const & obj) {
    this->ptr = obj.ptr;
}

~observer_ptr() {
}

You're suggesting that the class provides a move constructor that looks like:

observer_ptr(observer_ptr<T> && obj) {
    this->ptr = obj.ptr;
    obj.ptr = null;
}

When I would suggest that the existing copy constructor will work fine as is, and is cheaper than the suggested move constructor.

What about std::vector though?

A std::vector, when copied, actually copies the array that it backs. So, a std::vector copy constructor looks something like:

vector(vector<T> const & obj) {
    for (auto const & elem : obj)
        this->push_back(elem);
}

The move constructor for the std::vector can optimize this. It can do this because that memory can be stolen from obj. In a std::vector, this is actually useful to do.

vector(vector<T> && obj) {
    this->data_ptr = obj.data_ptr;
    obj.data_ptr = nullptr;
    obj.size = 0;
}
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2  
+1, though I suggest using nullptr instead of null in C++11. –  Marc Claesen Mar 10 at 21:01
    
@MarcClaesen: There we go. –  Bill Lynch Mar 10 at 21:03
2  
Besides the cheapness or not of the move operation, it wouldn't make sense semantically. The observer_ptr is just that. It has no interest in or knowledge of the lifetime of the pointee. It exists merely for documentation purposes. –  juanchopanza Mar 10 at 21:04
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@πάνταῥεῖ std::weak_ptr is "too clever": it allows you to check validity, and get shared ownership. –  juanchopanza Mar 10 at 21:24
2  
"So, move constructors are designed to make copy constructors cheaper in certain cases." That's one use, but not the only one. They also allow non-copyable things to be passed by value, e.g. std::thread, std::unique_ptr, std::future etc. and all of those things rely on being empty after a move. –  Jonathan Wakely Mar 10 at 22:10

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