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Over the past day I have been trying to finalize a view controller that accesses the contacts in a user's address book. I have been signing up with various apps and going through their signup flows where they ask you for access to your address book.

There are 2 different ways that these apps handle address book access:

  1. The app wants access to contacts, so they show a UIAlertView window that says something like this: "We need to access your address book. You can enable this by going to Settings > Privacy > Contacts > Turn on for App Name.

  2. The app wants access to contacts, so they show a UIAlertView window that says something like this: "We need to access your contacts so we can find your friends"

What's different though about option 2 is that in the UIAlertView window, they actually have 2 buttons for "Don't Allow" and "OK".

I was under the impression that if you actually press "OK" it will allow access to your contacts, and if you press "Don't Allow" it will block the app from accessing your contacts.

However, even if I press "OK" in these apps, it doesn't even change the privacy settings. Pressing "Don't Allow" doesn't change anything either.

So, are these apps just choosing to show "OK" and "Don't Allow" for whatever reason, despite the fact that they don't even work or have any functionality at all? I assumed that there was a way to programmatically change the privacy settings, and that by pressing the "OK" button a method was being called that actually did something.

I am using iOS 7.0.4 on an iPhone 4S and I just recently started developing for iOS so I only have experience with iOS 7.

I just don't understand what's really possible and why I am experiencing the behavior above.

If someone could clear this up for me I would really appreciate it.

share|improve this question

The first one does not change any thing because it is an instruction that tells you how to enable the related privacy settings in the settings app. You have to go to the settings app and navigate to the right view and change the privacy setting by yourself

It is possible to access users' contacts on iOS devices. And you do not have to make up a customized message to tell users why you need the permission. Apple will prompt the user with a system alertView. I think the second one was supposed to bring up the system alertView when you pressed "ok".

You have to put the following code before accessing users' contacts. Somewhere in applicationDidFinishLaunching should be good.

ABAddressBookRef addressBookRef = ABAddressBookCreateWithOptions(NULL, NULL);

  if (ABAddressBookGetAuthorizationStatus() == kABAuthorizationStatusNotDetermined) {
    ABAddressBookRequestAccessWithCompletion(addressBookRef, ^(bool granted, CFErrorRef error) {
      if (granted) {
          // access has been granted.
      } else {
          // User denied access
      }
    });
  }
  else if (ABAddressBookGetAuthorizationStatus() == kABAuthorizationStatusAuthorized) {
    // The user has previously given access
  }
  else {
    // The user has previously denied access

  }
share|improve this answer
    
I should have been more clear. I already have code just like the above in my app and understand how it works for the most part. I just don't understand why app's would show a uialertview with an "OK" button and a "Don't allow" button, if pressing one of the buttons doesn't actually change the privacy settings for the app. – user3344977 Mar 10 '14 at 23:06
    
I think the second one was supposed to bring up the system alertView when you pressed "ok". But it failed. – Peter Zhou Mar 10 '14 at 23:09
    
What do you mean by system alertView? Is there a way to actually make those buttons functional and have them change the privacy settings for the app? By the way I have experienced option 2 on three popular messaging apps now. – user3344977 Mar 10 '14 at 23:11
    
I think they are trying to tell the users why access to contacts was needed for their apps. If you use the above code, on the first launch, you should see an UIAlertView from the system "Your app name" would like to Access your contacts." – Peter Zhou Mar 10 '14 at 23:13
    
I guess that's the only explanation. I just don't understand why they would do that, because if the user presses "OK" they might assume that doing that allowed access. It would be much smarter to tell them to go change the privacy settings themselves like option 1. – user3344977 Mar 10 '14 at 23:14

Short answer is that there is no (Apple authorized) way to change the privacy settings programmatically after the user has chosen the address book access option the first time the app is run. Since both of the options you outlined sound like they're developer generated, they can really mean and do anything.

share|improve this answer
    
"Short answer is that there is no (Apple authorized) way to change the privacy settings programmatically after the user has chosen the address book access option the first time the app is run." So are you saying that the first time the app is run, when the uialertview shows with buttons for "OK" and "Don't allow", that you can actually add functionality to those buttons and change privacy settings for the app by using them? – user3344977 Mar 10 '14 at 23:32
    
No, the first address book prompt is initiated by the system and you can only respond to what the user chooses at that point. If they choose "OK", you can load the address book in your app. If they choose "Don't Allow", your application has no access to the address book until the user changes the privacy setting in the phone settings. Also worth noting that the choice is saved even if you delete and reinstall the app, and can only be reset if you go to phone settings and reset your location & privacy settings. – JJC Mar 10 '14 at 23:38
    
Thank you for replying. I am now able to test this with truly "fresh" settings by going to Settings > General and then doing a reset for location and privacy settings and my app is now successfully showing the popup. I still don't understand why some of the popular messaging apps have UIAlertView's where you press OK and it doesn't change the settings. Could it be a glitch? – user3344977 Mar 11 '14 at 18:10
    
I don't think it's a glitch, more than it's unclear messaging that the developer of the app created. We know exactly what to expect when it's an alert view displayed by the system, but if it's one created by the developer, there's no guessing what it may actually do regardless of the wording of the alert message. In other words, the developer can put any kind of alert view up and say whatever they want, but there's no guarantee that it actually does what it says it's going to do :) – JJC Mar 11 '14 at 22:50
    
Yep exactly they might as well use Klingon for the UIAlertView content because it has no functionality attached to it whatsoever. I find it strange. One of the apps in particular that does this is Viber. – user3344977 Mar 12 '14 at 0:28

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