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The question is self explanatory, but please allow me to provide an example:

I have the following:

class Foo {
    def doAndPrint {
        val result = doSomething()
        val msg = message(result)
        println(msg)
    }

    private def message(result: Result): String = {
        "message formatted with %s".format(result)
    }
}

In this context, the question is: Should def message(result: Result) live in object Foo?

The argument in favor is making explicit that def message(result: Result) does not depends on any state within class Foo. The argument against is that the motivation of companion objects was to provide a place to put java public static methods.

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2 Answers 2

The answer to this false dichotomy is neither. It should be a local method to doAndPrint.

class Foo {
  def doAndPrint {
    val result = doSomething()
    def message(result: Result): String = s"message formatted with $result"
    val msg = message(result)
    println(msg)
  }
}

In fact,

class Foo {
  def doAndPrint {
    val result = doSomething()
    def message = s"message formatted with $result"
    println(message)
  }
}

Notice that it really depends on local state.

Edit: OK, as a nod to "self-explanatory," I would add, use the smallest scope that makes sense, and the example points out an asymmetry in the private relations between companions. Which begs for many puns which I haven't time to supply.

Answering more directly, from my observations, the companion module does not normally serve as a repository for FooUtil-style functions, though it does serve as a repository for implicit conversions, which have an arguably similar flavor, albeit public. Consider what winds up in the objects of collection types.

Consider a separation of concerns:

class Foo(f: String => Unit) {
  def doSomethingAndDoSomethingWithIt {
    val result = doSomething()
    def message = s"message formatted with $result"
    f(message)
  }
}
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1  
I think OP may have meant to reuse the private method in several other methods. –  ghik Mar 11 '14 at 0:24
    
Well, she (grammatical gender of euphoria) said it was self-explanatory and gave an example... –  som-snytt Mar 11 '14 at 0:30
    
@som-snytt while you provided a specific solution to my example problem, I was hoping for a more generic answer to this general dilemma. :) So, let's generalize the question a little bit. –  euphoria83 Mar 11 '14 at 0:39
    
@euphoria83 I'm not sure what the generic question is, but by separation of concerns, formatting and outputting should be in different places entirely. That would be my broadest reply. But best wishes in finding a satisfactory solution. –  som-snytt Mar 11 '14 at 0:42

You should put the methods where they belong. If you need to break things up for testing purposes, readability or even maintainability then you need to break them up. Even though Scala is influenced by FP concepts, FP patterns, and an FP mindset, it is still also an OO language.

Private helper methods are just that, helper methods to make your code easier to work with. If your class needs them, then there is no reason to spread out that logic in another class... just 'cause. Put them in the same place (and add in some means to access those methods for unit testing purposes like package visibility.)

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