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I have this function prototype code for factorial calculation by iteration How do I include a timer to produce total time spent for looping 100 times of the function?

for (unsigned long i=number; i>=1; i--) result *=i;

My C++ knowledge is barely basic, so not sure if "loop" is correctly mentioned here. However, I was hinted to use .

Pls advice

thank you

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FYI, this loop is so small as to probably be completely unmeasurable reliably. Multiplying two numbers one hundred times ought to be measured in terms of CPU cycles, not time. – screwnut Mar 11 '14 at 4:22

Here's a proper C++11 version of some timing logic:

using namespace std;
using namespace chrono;

auto start_time = system_clock::now();

// your loop goes here:
for (unsigned long i=number; i>=1; i--) result *=i;

auto end_time = system_clock::now();
auto durationInMicroSeconds = duration_cast<microseconds>(end_time - start_time);
cout << "Looping " << number << " times took " << durationInMicroSeconds << "microseconds" << endl;

Just for sport, here's a simple RAII-based variation:

class Timer {
  public:
    explicit Timer(const string& name)
    : name_(name)
    , start_time_(system_clock::now()) {
    }
    ~Timer() {
      auto end_time = system_clock::now();
      auto durationInMicroSeconds = duration_cast<microseconds>(end_time - start_time);
      cout << "Timer: " << name << " took " << durationInMicroSeconds << "microseconds" << endl;
    }
  private:
    string name_;
    system_clock::time_point start_time_;
};

Sure, it's a bit more code, but once you have that, you can reuse it fairly efficiently:

{  
  Timer timer("loops");
  // your loop goes here:
  for (unsigned long i=number; i>=1; i--) result *=i;
}
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If you looking for time spent in executing number of looping statements in the program code try making use of gettimeofday() as below,

#include <sys/time.h>
struct timeval  tv1, tv2;
gettimeofday(&tv1, NULL);
/* Your loop code to execute here */
gettimeofday(&tv2, NULL);
printf("Time taken in execution = %f seconds\n",
    (double) (tv2.tv_usec - tv1.tv_usec) / 1000000 +
    (double) (tv2.tv_sec - tv1.tv_sec));

This solution is more towards C which can be employed in your case to calculate time spent.

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Will only work if running on Linux/Unix though? – Ozraptor Mar 11 '14 at 4:06
    
Yes it works for Linux. – Sunil Bojanapally Mar 11 '14 at 4:20

This is a perfect situation for a lambda. Honestly I don't know the syntax in C++ but it should be something like this:

duration timer(function f) {
  auto start = system_clock::now();
  f();
  return system_clock::now() - start;
}

To use it, you wrap your code in a lambda and pass it to the timer. The effect is very similar to @Martin J.'s code.

duration code_time = timer([] () {
  // put any code that you want to time here
}

duration loop_time = timer([] () {
  for (unsigned long i=number; i>=1; i--) {
    result *=i;
  }
}
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