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does it matter if we install .net framework & then visual studio or does visual studio comes with the framework ? I know it's a basic question but i never thought of this honestly.

TIA

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4 Answers

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Nope doesn't matter, the framework is built into Windows and if your version of Windows does not have the framework for the VS you are installing VS will install it for you. Just make sure to run windows update after.

The framework was built to run side by side.

I currently run Visual Studio 2003,2005, and 2008. I have the 1.0,1.1,2.0,3.0,3.5 assemblies installed.

I did not install them in order and have never had an issue.

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thanks 'Vecdid', that's exactly what i was looking for. If my OS has 1.1 & i am installing VS2008, it should install 3.5 –  SoftwareGeek Feb 9 '10 at 19:41
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If you install Visual Studio and you don't have .NET installed already, the VS installation will launch the .NET installation as one of the pre-requisites. In my experience that's the easiest way to do it.

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As mentioned in the previous answers: no it doesn't matter if you're just talking about visual studio and the .NET framework.

However, if you need to install multiple versions of visual studio, it will matter, those need to be installed in chronological order, eg. VS.net, then VS2005, then VS2008 then VS2010. If you stray from that order, some solutions won't load correctly.

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Visual Studio comes with framework and will install the framework during installation. So all you need is basically installation DVD with Visual Studio.

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