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As I'm learning C++ I started implementing some common datastructures as a form of practice. The first one being a Stack (this was the first to spring in mind). I've done some programming and it's working, but now I need some input as to what I should do otherwise. Like deleting certain stuff or other pro tips. What should I do different and why?

template <class T>
class Stack
{
private:
    int* values;
    int capacity;
    int itemsOnStack;

public:

    /////////////////// 
    Stack()
    {
        Stack(32);
    }

    /////////////////// 
    Stack(const int sz)
    {
        values = new T[sz];
        capacity = sz;
        itemsOnStack = 0;
    }

    ~Stack()
    {
        values = 0;
               // delete?
    }

    ////////////////////
    void Push(const T& item)
    {   
        *(values + itemsOnStack) = item;

        itemsOnStack++;

        if(itemsOnStack > capacity)
        {
            capacity *= 2;

            T* temp = new T[capacity];
            temp = values;
            values = new T[capacity]; 
            values = temp;          
        }
    }

    /////////////////// 
    T Pop()
    {
        if(itemsOnStack > 0)
        {
            int current = --itemsOnStack;
            return *(values + current);
        }
        return NULL; // ? good?
    }

    /////////////////// 
    T Peek()
    {
        if(itemsOnStack > 0)
        {
            int current = itemsOnStack - 1;
            return *(values + current);
        }
        return NULL; // find something better here or shouldnt?
    }

    /////////////////// 
    int Count()
    {
        return itemsOnStack;
    }

    /////////////////// 
    int Capacity()
    {
        return capacity;
    }

    /////////////////// 
    bool IsEmpty()
    {
        return itemsOnStack == 0;
    }
};
share|improve this question
2  
Your code has LOTS of problems. Which C++ book are you learning from? –  anon Feb 9 '10 at 19:51
1  
Just a matter of taste but I prefer the values[current] syntax for pointer indexing. –  Manuel Feb 9 '10 at 20:15
1  
I won't post a full answer, but just one hint: It seems to me that your class currently works only when T = int. values should have type T* instead of int*, otherwise there's not much point in writing Stack as a template class. –  stakx Feb 9 '10 at 20:41
    
Hah, good point :) –  Oxymoron Feb 10 '10 at 6:53
    
@Neil: No book, just some tutorials at the moment. I've 'Absolute C++', 'Practical C++ Programming', 'Effective C++' and 'More effective C++' on their way. Apart from those I will dive in articles about memory leakage and such. The things I'm working on now are just try-outs to get used to the language, I guessed there was alot to improve, hence this post, mostly to get more terminology (none of the tuts got into initialization lists for example). –  Oxymoron Feb 10 '10 at 7:22

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Did a first pass of fixes on your code:

template <class T>
class Stack
{
private:
    int* values;
    int capacity;
    int itemsOnStack;

public:

    //Stack() : 
    //{
    //   Stack(32); // doesn't do what you expect. This would create an unnamed temporary stack object
    //}

    Stack(const int sz = 32) // C++ doesn't yet have delegating constructors. You can't call one ctor from another. But in this case, a simple default parameter can be used instead
   : values(new T[sz]), capacity(sz), itemsOnStack() {} // use the initializer list for initializing members

    ~Stack()
    {
        delete[] values; // you allocated it, so you delete it as well
    }

    ////////////////////
    void Push(const T& item)
    {   
        values[itemsOnStack] = item; // cleaner syntactically than your version
     //   *(values + itemsOnStack) = item;

        ++itemsOnStack; // prefer pre-increment by default.

        if(itemsOnStack > capacity) // you need to check this before writing the element. Move this to the top of the function
        {
            int newCapacity = capacity * 2;

            // what's this supposed to do? You're just copying pointers around, not the contents of the array
            T* temp = new T[newCapacity ];
            std::copy(values, values+capacity, temp); // copy the contents from the old array to the new one
            delete[] values; // delete the old array
            values = temp; // store a pointer to the new array
            capacity = newCapacity;
        }
    }

    /////////////////// 
    T Pop()
    {
        T result = Peek(); // you've already got a peek function. Why not use that?
        --itemsOnStack;
        return result;
    }

    /////////////////// 
    T Peek()
    {
        if(itemsOnStack > 0)
        {
            int current = itemsOnStack - 1;
            return values[current]; // again, array syntax is clearer than pointer arithmetics in this case.
        }
//        return NULL; // Only pointers can be null. There is no universal "nil" value in C++. Throw an exception would be my suggestion
          throw StackEmptyException();
    }

    /////////////////// 
    int Count()
    {
        return itemsOnStack;
    }

    /////////////////// 
    int Capacity()
    {
        return capacity;
    }

    /////////////////// 
    bool IsEmpty()
    {
        return itemsOnStack == 0;
    }
};

Things left to fix:

Copy constructor and assignment operator. At the moment, if I try to do this, it'll break horribly:

Stack<int> s;
Stack<int> t = s; // no copy constructor defined, so it'll just copy the pointer. Then both stacks will share the same internal array, and both will try to delete it when they're destroyed.
Stack<int> u;
u = s; // no assignment operator, so much like above, it'll blow up

Const correctness:
Shouldn't I be able to call Peek() or Count() on a const Stack<T>?

Object lifetime:
Popping an element off the stack doesn't call the element's destructor. Pushing an element doesn't call the element's constructor. Simply expanding the array calls the default constructor immediately for all new elements. The constructor should be called when the user inserts an element and not befre, and the destructor immediately when an element is removed.

And, uh, proper testing:
I haven't compiled, run, tested or debugged this in any way. So I've most likely missed some bugs, and introduced a few new ones. ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Don't you mean delete[] values? –  Ray Hidayat Feb 9 '10 at 20:39
    
doh yeah, fixed it. –  jalf Feb 9 '10 at 20:41
    
+1 for above and beyond the call of duty! –  stusmith Feb 9 '10 at 21:29
    
You forgot to make values a T*. –  Manuel Feb 9 '10 at 23:37
    
This was very helpful, as said: I'm pretty new to C++, coming from C#, and I don't want to pick up all sorts of bad coding practices. –  Oxymoron Feb 10 '10 at 6:59

To name a few along with what John noted:

1.) Use initialization lists
2.) Use const member functions where applicable.
3.) Use function names more closely aligned with the standard. (empty() instead of IsEmpty())
4.) You have huge memory leaks. Destroy memory in your destructor

share|improve this answer
1  
Good advice, except for the virtual destructor. Why'd he want that? Blindly encouraging subclassing is hardly a good idea. If the class isn't designed specifically for it, it should not have a virtual destructor –  jalf Feb 9 '10 at 20:51
    
Yea, I went a little overboard there I suppose. Thanks for the comment. –  RC. Feb 9 '10 at 20:57

You have lots of memory leaks, particularly if you copy, assign or push to your Stack object. Even as a learning exercise I would suggest steering clear of doing your own memory management (it is something that you do need to learn in C++, but take one step at a time). Instead, use std::vector or std::list rather than your raw C-style array of values. This will mean that the destructor, copy constructor, assignment operator and Push() method won't leak memory -- they'll also do the right thing by default (I call this the Principle of Least Surprise). I think one of the most important parts of C++ learning is knowing how to use the STL. Understand that first and worry about pointers and new[] and delete[] later.

I would suggest reading up on copy constructors, assignment operators and destructors so you know how values are actually copied around and deleted. Try writing a class:

class Noisy {
  public:
    Noisy() { std::cout << "Constructor" << std::endl; }
    ~Noisy() { std::cout << "Destructor" << std::endl; }
    Noisy& operator=(const Noisy& other) {std::cout << "Assign" << std::endl; }
    Noisy(const Noisy& other) {std::cout << "Copy constructor" << std::endl; }
};

and then do a few operations on Stack<Noisy>:

Stack<Noisy> stack(10);
stack.Push(Noisy());
Stack<Noisy> otherStack(stack);
Stack<Noisy> thirdStack;
thirdStack=stack;

and see if your expectations of what you think it should be doing match up with what you see in the console window.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I will dive in to STL then :) –  Oxymoron Feb 10 '10 at 7:01

You should probably delete values in the destructor instead of just setting it to 0;

in your push method, you cannot resize an array like that.

more info on resizing arrays: http://www.daniweb.com/forums/thread13709.html#

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Push(): You should check the size of the array before writing to it

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you need to adopt a naming convention four you member variables. We use

 int *m_values;
 int m_capactity;

etc.

And why do you do

 *(values + itemsOnStack) = item;

I assume you mean

 values[itemsOnStack] = item;

they do exactly the same thing but the first is much more natural

share|improve this answer
    
Using m_<member> is just a much a convention as choosing not to use it. I might as well use this-> or nothing at all e.g. IMHO it doesn't add alot of clarity to the code. –  Oxymoron Feb 10 '10 at 7:46
1  
seriously? You are going against the industry accepted best practices big time. The point about using this-> is irrelevant. Since this-> is optional you will stop doing it, and certainly a co-developer will never do it (since he thinks that this-> is flaky). You might as will say "i can put a comment on every line saying 'foo is a member, bar is a local'". Trust me - you will be happy you chose some naking convention –  pm100 Feb 10 '10 at 18:09
    
Maybe it's because of my .NET background, where I've gotten used to shorthand properties with backing fields; public string Name { get; private set; }. Ofcourse, I don't want to argue about the necessity of having a concise coding standard. –  Oxymoron Feb 11 '10 at 9:39

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