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Here's a short function designed to test a string against a regular expression that only matches ascii characters:

<?php
$test = 'æhrzBGFX029!^%/\#,.';
if (preg_match('/^[[:ascii:]]*$/u', $test)) {
    echo 'ERR: this shouldn\'t have matched: \'' . $test . '\'';
} else {
    echo 'OK';
}

On Ubuntu, this passes correctly (OK is printed). However on Mac OS X (Mavericks) this returns the error response (ERR: this shouldn't have matched).

I can't figure out why this is. Any ideas?

EDIT: The OS X locale settings are:

LANG="en_US"
LC_COLLATE="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_CTYPE="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_MESSAGES="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_MONETARY="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_NUMERIC="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_TIME="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_ALL="en_US.UTF-8"

The language settings on an Ubuntu box where it does pass correctly (returns OK) are:

LANG=en_US.UTF-8
LANGUAGE=
LC_CTYPE="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_NUMERIC="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_TIME="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_COLLATE="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_MONETARY="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_MESSAGES="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_PAPER="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_NAME="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_ADDRESS="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_TELEPHONE="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_MEASUREMENT="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_IDENTIFICATION="en_US.UTF-8"
LC_ALL=
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1  
I have tested it on PHP versions 5.3.28 and 5.4.25 on Mavericks and it works well –  Michael Sivolobov Mar 11 '14 at 9:38
    
What version of PHP do you use? –  Michael Sivolobov Mar 11 '14 at 9:39
1  
Is it possible your Ubuntu and OSX installations may be using different locales? If so, what happens when you change one or the other and try this again? –  Kelvin Mar 11 '14 at 9:40
    
I'm on PHP 5.5.5. Will try changing the locales and see what happens. –  surfitscrollit Mar 11 '14 at 9:48
1  
Yes, the string contains non-ascii characters so the script should always output 'OK' (which means no match). However, I have the same experience with Mavericks and php 5.4 and 5.5 (pattern is matched). Might be an issue with running php > 5.3 on OSX, but I can't see why. –  Sam Adams Mar 11 '14 at 10:22

2 Answers 2

This could be caused by differences between the locales of the two operating systems.

From O'Reilly's Programming PHP:

In particular, what constitutes a "letter" varies from language to language (think of à and ç), and there are character classes in POSIX regular expressions that take this into account.

...

POSIX defines a number of named sets of characters that you can use in character classes. [...] The actual letters vary from locale to locale.

http://docstore.mik.ua/orelly/webprog/php/ch04_09.htm

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

It turns out that the :ascii: expression is evaluated differently across the installation (however I'm not sure if it's on the operating system's end, or the PHP side, or brew, or something else).

Therefore, the issue can be solved in this instance by replacing /^[[:ascii:]]*$/u expression with /^[\x00-\x7F]*$/u. The full code is then:

<?php
$test = 'æhrzBGFX029!^%/\#,.';
if (preg_match('/^[\x00-\x7F]*$/u', $test)) {
    echo 'ERR: this shouldn\'t have matched: \'' . $test . '\'';
} else {
    echo 'OK';
}
share|improve this answer

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