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I want to compare a String with an Enum. I know how to do the comparison properly but i don't understand exactly why. My following example shows my issue:

enum Foo{
    TEST1
}

String likeEnumTest1 = "TEST1";
System.out.println("Is enum equal string?: " + likeEnumTest1.equals(Foo.TEST1));
System.out.println("Is enum.toString() equal string?: " + likeEnumTest1.equals(Foo.TEST1.toString()));
System.out.println("Value of enum '" + Foo.TEST1 + "' and value of string '" + likeEnumTest1+"'");

The output is:

Is enum equal string?: false
Is enum.toString() equal string?: true
Value of enum 'TEST1' and value of string 'TEST1'

I understand that Enum.toString() is called implicit when using it in System.println(), but i don't understand what the Enum uses as value when compared with equals() in the second line. Is Foo.TEST1 used as Integer or anything else, what does JAVA do internally?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The String#equals(Object) method first checks if the passed argument is an instance of String or not. Here's a snippet of the source code:

public boolean equals(Object anObject) {
    if (this == anObject) {
        return true;
    }
    if (anObject instanceof String) {
        // Code [...]
    }
    return false;
}

Since Foo.TEST1 is not an instance of String, it returns false.

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Thank you for the explanation, now i understand the equal method for my case –  alex Mar 11 at 11:23

Q. I want to compare a String with an Enum

Enum provides a name() method. You need to use that to be able to compare a enum object with a String because the equals() method checks if the argument is a String instance or not. And since it is not, it'd would return false.

likeEnumTest1.equals(Foo.TEST1.name())

This can be seen from the source code of equals() of String class

public boolean equals(Object anObject) { // It takes an object and even enum is an object, thus it doesn't call the `toString()` method.
    if (this == anObject) {
        return true;
    }
    if (anObject instanceof String) {
        String anotherString = (String)anObject;
        int n = count;
        if (n == anotherString.count) {
            char v1[] = value;
            char v2[] = anotherString.value;
            int i = offset;
            int j = anotherString.offset;
            while (n-- != 0) {
                if (v1[i++] != v2[j++])
                    return false;
            }
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
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