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In the following code in HeadDirective.prototype.link, this is equal to the global window object rather than the HeadDirective instance. My understanding is that the value of this inside a prototype function is the containing object itself.

var HeadDirective = (function () {
    function HeadDirective($rootScope, $compile) {
        this.$rootScope = $rootScope;
        this.$compile = $compile;
        this.restrict = 'E';
    }
    HeadDirective.prototype.link = function (scope, elem) {
        var html = '<link rel="stylesheet" ng-repeat="cssUrl in routeStyles" ng-href="{{cssUrl}}" />';
        elem.append(this.$compile(html)(scope));
        scope.routeStyles = [];
        this.$rootScope.$on('$routeChangeStart', function (e, next, current) {
            if (next && next.$$route && next.$$route.css) {
                if (!Array.isArray(next.$$route.css)) {
                    next.$$route.css = [next.$$route.css];
                }
                angular.forEach(next.$$route.css, function (sheet) {
                    scope.routeStyles.push(sheet);
                });
            }
        });
        this.$rootScope.$on('$routeChangeSuccess', function (e, next, current) {
            if (current && current.$$route && current.$$route.css) {
                if (!Array.isArray(current.$$route.css)) {
                    current.$$route.css = [current.$$route.css];
                }
                angular.forEach(current.$$route.css, function (sheet) {
                    scope.routeStyles.splice(scope.routeStyles.indexOf(sheet), 1);
                });
            }
        });
    };
    return HeadDirective;
})();

directives.directive('head', [
    '$rootScope', '$compile', function ($rootScope, $compile) {
        return new HeadDirective($rootScope, $compile);
    }]);

The above code was generated from the following TypeScript:

class HeadDirective implements ng.IDirective {

    constructor(private $rootScope: ng.IRootScopeService, private $compile: ng.ICompileService) {}

    link(scope: IScope, elem: JQuery): void {
        var html = '<link rel="stylesheet" ng-repeat="cssUrl in routeStyles" ng-href="{{cssUrl}}" />';
        elem.append(this.$compile(html)(scope));
        scope.routeStyles = [];
        this.$rootScope.$on('$routeChangeStart', (e: ng.IAngularEvent, next?: IRoute, current?: IRoute): any => {
            if(next && next.$$route && next.$$route.css){
                if(!Array.isArray(next.$$route.css)){
                    next.$$route.css = [next.$$route.css];
                }
                angular.forEach(next.$$route.css, (sheet: string) => {
                    scope.routeStyles.push(sheet);
                });
            }
        });
        this.$rootScope.$on('$routeChangeSuccess', (e: ng.IAngularEvent, next?: IRoute, current?: IRoute): any => {
            if(current && current.$$route && current.$$route.css){
                if(!Array.isArray(current.$$route.css)){
                    current.$$route.css = [current.$$route.css];
                }
                angular.forEach(current.$$route.css, (sheet) => {
                    scope.routeStyles.splice(scope.routeStyles.indexOf(sheet), 1);
                });
            }
        });
    }

    restrict = 'E';
}

directives.directive('head', ['$rootScope','$compile', ($rootScope: ng.IRootScopeService, $compile: ng.ICompileService): ng.IDirective =>{
    return new HeadDirective($rootScope, $compile);
}]);

According to the latest TypeScript language specification:

The type of this in an expression depends on the location in which the reference takes place:

  • In a constructor, instance member function, instance member accessor, or instance member variable initializer, this is of the class instance type of the containing class.
  • In a static member function or static member accessor, the type of this is the constructor function type of the containing class.
  • In a function declaration or a standard function expression, this is of type Any.
  • In the global module, this is of type Any.

In all other contexts it is a compile-time error to reference this.

The TypeScript language specification is quite clear. Inside a member function (which is compiled into a prototype function), this refers to the class instance. This is obviously not what I'm seeing.

Any ideas? Could Browserify be interfering with this?

share|improve this question
    
A video on this in typescript : youtube.com/watch?v=tvocUcbCupA&hd=1 –  basarat Apr 21 at 5:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The this keyword is highly contextual. If a method is called by an event, this will be the object that is the event target, for example.

You can get around this problem by shimmying this into a variable, or by using the JavaScript call (or apply) methods to bind the scope of this.

Short example... here is the premise:

class MyClass {
    constructor(private myProp: string) {

    }

    myMethod() {
        alert(this.myProp);
    }
}

var myClass = new MyClass('Test');

// 'Test'
myClass.myMethod();

// undefined
window.setTimeout(myClass.myMethod, 1000);

Solution One - Arrow Syntax

In TypeScript the arrow syntax will shimmy this into a variable called _this automatically for you and substitute usages inside the arrow function... So this will solve the undefined issue above and instead alert Test.

class MyClass {
    constructor(private myProp: string) {

    }

    public myMethod = () => {
        alert(this.myProp);
    }
}

Solution Two - Call Method

You can use the call method to replace the contextual this with any object you like, in the example below we reset it to be the myClass instance.

This works whether you are writing TypeScript or plain JavaScript... whereas the first solution is really a TypeScript solution.

window.setTimeout(function() { myClass.myMethod.call(myClass) }, 1000);

Or to be shorter (to be clear, the use of the arrow function here has nothing to do with scope - it is just a shorter syntax arrow functions only affect scope if you have this inside of them):

window.setTimeout(() => myClass.myMethod.call(myClass), 1000);
share|improve this answer
    
Would you say, then, that the TypeScript language specification makes a promise it cannot keep? –  Steve Taylor Mar 11 at 12:09
2  
The spec is describing the compile-time type of the this keyword in the section you quoted, not the value. Because TypeScript has the same this semantics as JavaScript at runtime, it's always going to be possible to end up with the 'wrong' value. –  Ryan Cavanaugh Mar 11 at 14:28
    
OK. If this inside an object's constructors, methods, accessors and mutators isn't always equal to the class instance itself, then there is no point having classes. If I want JavaScript semantics, I'll use JavaScript. –  Steve Taylor Mar 11 at 23:43
    
@SteveTaylor I understand your frustration - but actually you will want to choose when to use this as the instance and this as the context. Event handling, for example, works much better if you can use this in context. –  Steve Fenton Mar 12 at 9:27
    
Yes, I want to at least be able to choose without ugly hacks (e.g. shoving everything into the constructor, thereby not being able to implement interfaces and generally making the class and constructor keywords no better than comments). Failing choice, I much prefer what all other languages with classes have, which is a built-in, guaranteed method of accessing an instance from its own instance methods. –  Steve Taylor Mar 12 at 9:42

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