Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've done a little investigation on this topic but I still can't see when Double Checked Locking singleton may be a better choise than singleton on Holder.
It would be great if someone could give me an example.

DCL

public class Singleton {
public static volatile Singleton INSTANCE = null;

private Singleton(){

}

public static Singleton getInstance(){
    if (INSTANCE == null){
        synchronized (Singleton.class) {
            if (INSTANCE == null){
                INSTANCE = new Singleton();
            }
        }
    }
    return INSTANCE;
}
}

HOLDER

public class Singleton {
    private Singleton() {

    }

    private static class Holder {
        public static final Singleton INSTANCE = new Singleton();
    }

    public static Singleton getInstance(){
        return Holder.INSTANCE;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
And why do you think that it could be better? –  user3159253 Mar 11 at 11:14
    
Instead of the Holder idiom use enum, it's less code with the same effect. –  Marko Topolnik Mar 11 at 11:20
    
Well, why don't we use Holder idiom every time then? I fail to see why some people choose DCL singleton instead of HOLDER. –  Anton Kasyanchuk Mar 11 at 11:31
    
With the Holder scheme you have no real control of when the singleton is initialized. It might be lazy, or not, depending on whether the JVM decides the Holder class is being "referenced" in a way that requires initialization. And note, of course, that if lazy initialization is not desired then a plain old inited static is far superior to a complex initialization scheme. –  Hot Licks Mar 11 at 11:44
    
BTW Holder class should be private, because in this case you can create Holder object like: Singleton.Holder = new Singleton.Holder() and initialize INSTANCE straightaway. –  Jakub Hr Mar 11 at 11:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.