Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've been playing with Haskell and writing some code to parse DICOM medical images. The code is here. I wanted to create a function that will take in a ByteString and return a name. So a certain ByteString (actually two Int64s taken from a ByteString) would return PatientName or StudyDate for example. There are thousands of these and they are all contained within an XML file. So to create the function I parse the XML file and generate the desired function and output to a file using

writeTagNameFromElemGroup :: FilePath -> [(String,String,String,String)] -> IO()
writeTagNameFromElemGroup fp tups = init >> Prelude.appendFile fp ( Prelude.drop 0 tags )
    where init = Prelude.appendFile fp "\ntagNameFromElem :: Element -> Group -> String\ntagNameFromElem e g\n"
      tags = LS.concat $ Prelude.map (\tup -> "    | " ++ (writeTup tup) ++ "\n") filTups
      hexInt x = show . readHex $ x
      filTups = LS.filter (\(w,x,y,z) -> Prelude.length w == 4 && Prelude.length x ==4 ) tups

This creates the desired function in Tags.hs

tagNameFromElem :: Int64 -> Int64 -> String
tagNameFromElem e g
    | e == 8 && g == 1 = "LengthToEnd"
    | e == 8 && g == 5 = "SpecificCharacterSet"
    | e == 8 && g == 6 = "LanguageCodeSequence"
    | e == 8 && g == 8 = "ImageType"
    | e == 8 && g == 16 = "RecognitionCode"
    | e == 8 && g == 18 = "InstanceCreationDate"
    | e == 8 && g == 19 = "InstanceCreationTime"
    | e == 8 && g == 20 = "InstanceCreatorUID"
    | e == 8 && g == 22 = "SOPClassUID"
    | e == 8 && g == 24 = "SOPInstanceUID"
    | e == 8 && g == 26 = "RelatedGeneralSOPClassUID"
    | e == 8 && g == 27 = "OriginalSpecializedSOPClassUID"
    ..... > 2000 more

Every so often there is a special case like

    | e == 1000 && mod (g -5) 10 == 0 = "ShiftTableTriplet"

which put me off just using a map.

Now this approach works but it takes a very long time to load (Over a minute) the whole which makes me think that I'm not doing this how it should be done. To reproduce I suggest cloning the repo and loading the Tags.hs.

A SSCE

writeFunc :: (Num x, Show x) => FilePath -> [x] -> IO()
writeFunc fp xs  = init >> Prelude.appendFile fp ( maps ) >> Prelude.appendFile fp "|  otherwise = 0 "
    where init = Prelude.appendFile fp "mapVal :: Int -> Int \nmapVal x\n    "
          maps = concat $ Prelude.map (\x -> "| x == " ++ show x ++ " = " ++ show (x +1 ) ++ "\n    ") xs

Use a long list ~ few thousand values and try to import the resulting file

share|improve this question
2  
Your first condition is matching on the value of e, could you possibly use a Map Int64 (Int64 -> String) where your e is the key and (Int64 -> String) is a function that returns the appropriate string based on the value of g? You could then split this huge function into several smaller ones (they'd still be relatively large, but smaller than 2000 lines), but it'd probably compile a bit faster. Alternatively, consider doing nested case statements, i.e. case e of { 8 -> case g of { 1 -> "LengthToEnd"; ... }; ...}. – bheklilr Mar 11 '14 at 13:32
    
It wouldn't be as pretty, but generated code doesn't have to be. – bheklilr Mar 11 '14 at 13:32
2  
Following bheklilr's idea, you could catch the special cases (supposing they're just a few of them) using pattern matching, and the "_" pattern would default to a Map lookup. – Ariel D. Moya Sequeira Mar 11 '14 at 14:59
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This answer is based on what bheklilr suggested in the question's comments. Code generation is up to you.

I reviewed your code and found that there are only two values in which e imposes special conditions on g: e == 28 and e == 1000. So, it'd be better to handle those in separate functions. Choose better names than the following ones, please.

e28 :: Map Int64 String
e28 = fromList [ (0, "CodeLabel"), (2, "NumberOfTables"), ... ]

e1000 :: Map Int64 String
e1000 :: fromList [ (0, "EscapeTriplet"), (1, "RunLengthTriplet"), ... ]

The keys of the previous maps are taken from your special-case predicate: mod (g - key) 10 == 0.

The case where e == 1010 is also special, since it doesn't depend on g. It's always "ZonalMap", so it'll be dealt with later.

Now, just create the rest of maps using g as key.

e40 :: Map Int64 String
e40 = fromList [ (2, "SamplesPerPixel"), (3, "SamplesPerPixelUsed"), ... ]

e84 :: Map Int64 String
e84 = fromList [ ... ]

...

Create a map from regular es (i.e. not the 28, 1000 or 1010 ones) to their corresponding map:

regularE :: Map Int64 (Map Int64 String)
regularE e = fromList [ (40, e40), (84, e84), ... ]

To sum it all up:

import Control.Monad

tagNameFromElem :: Int64 -> Int64 -> Maybe String
tagNameFromElem   28 g = lookup e28 (mod g 10)
tagNameFromElem 1000 g = lookup e1000 (mod g 10)
tagNameFromElem 1010 _ = Just "ZonalMap"
tagNameFromElem    e g = lookup regularE e >>= (`lookup` g)

The lookup function is from Data.Map, just in case qualification is required. Using Maybe handles the case where e or g do not map to a valid tag name, instead of a hardcoded "Not Found" string.

Note that I haven't tested this code; I'm not at home right now.

If you want, try IntMap instead of Map. You'll need to work with regular Ints in this case, but it may be good for this project.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the exact kind of solution I was suggesting, doing a very large case statement like that would give long compile times and poor performance since it's treated as a linear lookup table, whereas a Map gives better big-O complexity and can compress the code to only a few lines. – bheklilr Mar 11 '14 at 16:36
1  
@bheklilr I came up with the solution after reading the question, then I read your comment and thought "some one got there first". So, I just elaborated a bit more in order to handle special and regular cases using Maps. The core idea is the one you described. – Ariel D. Moya Sequeira Mar 11 '14 at 16:54
1  
I still like IntMaps better, but they don't work with Int64. Using fromIntegral solves that, though. – Ariel D. Moya Sequeira Mar 11 '14 at 16:57
1  
I agree, IntMap would be more efficient would be easy to use in this situation. If there is a specific need for Int64, Data.Map should suffice, although it will be somewhat slower (probably not noticeably though) – bheklilr Mar 11 '14 at 17:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.