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WindowsCE 5.0, NET Compact framework 3.5

I need to update UI periodically, so I decided to use Threading.Timer. My code looks like below and it works good except the Presenter.Stop() appears during Timer's callback procedure.

Debug outputs says that it newer exits from UpdateViewSafe and Stop will always wait at Monitor.Enter(sync). Where is my fault? I tried to use Thread instead of the Timer, but it also deadlock at Thread's callback, so I guess the problem somewhere between locking sync object and Control.Invoke.

Source code:

class Presenter
{
  private MyForm view;
  private Timer timer;
  private object sync;

  public Presenter(MyForm form)
  {
    view = form;
    sync = new object();
  }

  public void Start()
  {
    timer = new Timer(UpdateViewSafe, null, 0, 2000);
  }

  public void Stop()
  {
    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("+++ Stop 1");
    Monitor.Enter(sync);
    timer.Change(Timeout.Infinite, Timeout.Infinite);
    timer.Dispose();
    Monitor.Exit(sync);
    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("+++ Stop 2");
  }

  private void UpdateViewSafe(object state)
  {
    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("+++ UpdateViewSafe 1");
    Monitor.Enter(sync);
    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("+++ UpdateViewSafe 2");
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("+++ UpdateViewSafe 3");
    view.InvokeIfNeeded(() => view.MyText = "text");
    Monitor.Exit(sync);
    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("+++ UpdateViewSafe 4");
  }
}

public static void InvokeIfNeeded(this Control control, Action doIt)
{
  if (control == null) return;
  if (control.InvokeRequired)
    control.Invoke(doIt);
  else
    doIt();
}       

Output from debug:

+++ UpdateViewSafe 1
+++ UpdateViewSafe 2
+++ Stop 1
+++ UpdateViewSafe 3

and I never see

+++ Stop 2
share|improve this question

I need to update UI periodically, so I decided to use Threading.Timer.

As you're using Winforms, I would recommend using System.Windows.Forms.Timer instead. It uses the UI message pump, so the code is executed in the same thread than the UI, which means:

  • it is synchronous
  • you won't need to use Invoke to update your UI controls

You won't have a good precision (~50 ms), but in most cases it should be enough for UI updates.

Side note: Use lock(lockObject){ ... } instead of Monitor (almost identical but easier to use as the critical section scope is materialized)

share|improve this answer
    
I prefer to place update logic into presenter instead of view. Anyway I would like to understand where is the problem with my code. – wince Mar 11 '14 at 12:45
    
He didn't advocate moving logic into the view. Forms timers work just fine in Presenters. – ctacke Mar 12 '14 at 2:32

Since we're not seeing how Start and Stop are being called, it's difficult to tell exactly how you'd get the output you have.

It's likely that Stop was called and scheduled before the UpdateViewSafe entered the Monitor, but it's not gotten a timeslice. This allows UpdateViewSafe to execute through to the Sleep at which point context is switched to the thread running Stop, which executes down to the Monitor.Enter where it waits. At that point UpdateViewSafe starts running again.

I don't see the rest of your output either, but I'd guess you'd see this in total

+++ UpdateViewSafe 1
+++ UpdateViewSafe 2
+++ Stop 1
+++ UpdateViewSafe 3
+++ UpdateViewSafe 4
+++ Stop 2

Though it's quite possible that the last two lines could get swapped, depending on how you end up in scheduler quantum. It definitely could run either way, so don't depend on one or the other.

If you want to control the "Stop 1" output, then it needs to be inside the critical section - that's how critical sections work.

share|improve this answer
    
Start and Stop are being called by user public MyForm() { InitializeComponent(); presenter = new Presenter(this); buttonStart.Click += delegate { presenter.Start(); }; buttonStop.Click += delegate { presenter.Stop(); }; } and I never see +++ Stop 2 message when Stop appears during UpdateViewSafe executes. It works the same way even when only one timer's tick was scheduled: timer = new Timer(UpdateViewSafe, null, 0, Timeout.Infinite); In real code there is no Thread.Sleep(1000), this is just to simulate the situation. – wince Mar 12 '14 at 6:41

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