Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hey everyone I am making an awk bash script that will take an input text file such as:

1111 Joe Brown
2222 Charlie Rogers
3333 Chris Williams
4444 Rob Black

And simply reverse the order of the rows, so output would be:

4444 Rob Black
3333 Chris Williams
2222 Charlie Rogers
1111 Joe Brown

I am getting a syntax error saying that there is an error near "(" and also that I have an extra "{" I cannot figure out what is happening here is my code:

#!/bin/bash
awk '{a[NR]=$0} END (for(i=NR; i>=1; i--)) printf("%s\n",a[i])}'
share|improve this question
    
The simplest way to reverse the lines is tac filename. But that won't teach you any awk. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Mar 11 '14 at 14:41
    
Well, you can do tac filename | awk '1' :) –  fedorqui Mar 11 '14 at 14:45
1  
You're missing the { bracket after END and there's a superfluous pair of ( ) around the for clause. –  Henk Langeveld Mar 11 '14 at 14:58
    
Possible duplicate of How can I reverse the order of lines in a file? –  Henk Langeveld Mar 11 '14 at 15:02

5 Answers 5

You have two extra brackets there. Correcting it:

awk '{a[NR]=$0} END {for(i=NR; i>=1; i--) printf("%s\n",a[i]);}' file

If you don't have to use awk, you can do easily with: tac file

share|improve this answer

If it is unix machine tac can be used.

share|improve this answer
1  
tac is not a standard unix command, but is part of the Gnu coreutils (present in most linux distros). –  Henk Langeveld Mar 11 '14 at 15:01

You can probably use just sort(1) command.

sort -nr < input.txt

Sort simply takes the input file and tries to sort it, taking the whitespace as a separator (which is our case), so it sorts the input by first column. If you need non-alphabetical sorting of the first column, the -n switch is needed (to sort numerically). The -r switch just reverses the output (ascending/descending).

share|improve this answer
    
If you simply need to reverse the content of the file, you can use tac(1), which is present on the most unix systems, as @Dinesh mentioned. –  tvm Mar 11 '14 at 14:44

perl solution:

$ perl -e 'print reverse <>' file
4444 Rob Black
3333 Chris Williams
2222 Charlie Rogers
1111 Joe Brown

or sed

$ sed '1!G;h;$!d' file
4444 Rob Black
3333 Chris Williams
2222 Charlie Rogers
1111 Joe Brown
share|improve this answer

Here is an awk variation:

awk '{a[i++]=$0} END {while(i--) print a[i]}' file
4444 Rob Black
3333 Chris Williams
2222 Charlie Rogers
1111 Joe Brown
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.