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I'm trying to get the products that havn't been made in the last 2 years. I'm not that great with SQL but here's what i've started with and it doesn't work.

Lets say for this example that my schema looks like this

prod_id, date_created, num_units_created.

I'll take any advice i can get.

select id, (select date from table
            where date <= sysdate - 740) older,
           (select date from table
            where date >= sysdate - 740) newer 
from table 
where newer - older

I'm not being clear enough.

Basically i want all products that havn't been produced in the last 2 years. Whenever a product is produced, a line gets added. So if i just did sysdate <= 740, it would only give me all the products that were produced from the beginning up til 2 years ago.

I want all products that have been produced in the at least once, but not in the last 2 years.

I hope that clears it up.

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1  
Can you tell us what your schema looks like? –  Steve Homer Feb 9 '10 at 22:33
    
How does your table look like? –  Peter Lang Feb 9 '10 at 22:33
    
Umm i'm not actually sure. I know it's just off the one table so you should just be able to do it off the date in that table right? –  Catfish Feb 9 '10 at 22:34
    
say there's only 2 columns id and date. –  Catfish Feb 9 '10 at 22:34
    
Can you provide more information about what older and newer columns are for? You can use ADD_MONTHS(SYSDATE, -24) to get a date two years in the past. –  OMG Ponies Feb 9 '10 at 22:36

4 Answers 4

GROUP BY with HAVING

select id, max(date)
from table
group by id
having max(date) < add_months(sysdate,-24)
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+1 Both correct and the most simple solution. –  APC Feb 10 '10 at 6:07
    
This seems like it'll work. Can you explain to me how it works? You are selecting the most recent date where the most recent date is less than 2 years ago? Should that be select id,max(date) from table group by id having date < add_months(sysdate, -24)?? Can you explain why that is wrong? –  Catfish Feb 10 '10 at 17:23
    
Because you want to know when the LATEST date is before two years ago. The max is the latest date. –  Gary Myers Feb 10 '10 at 21:38

I'd use SQL's dateadd function.

where date < dateadd(year,-2,getdate())

would be a where clause that would select records with date less than 2 years from the current date.

Hope that helps.

EDIT: If you want to go by days, use dateadd(d,-740,getdate())

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3  
DATEADD doesn't exist in Oracle, ADD_MONTHS(SYSDATE, -24) is equivalent. –  OMG Ponies Feb 9 '10 at 22:38
    
Fair enough. I saw the SQL tag in the question. Thanks. –  Aaron Feb 9 '10 at 22:40
    
That's one little behavior I detested about IBM in the day and detest about Microsoft when it happens: co-opting common words and phrases to designate specific products. There's the IBM Personal Computer, Microsoft SQL Server, two different varieties of Disk Operating System (hint: the one I was originally familiar with ran on 360s), and more. –  David Thornley Feb 9 '10 at 22:49

Maybe something like this?

select id, date
from table
where date <= (sysdate - 730);
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Guess this would return ids that have been produced more than 2 years ago, but not remove those that have not been produced within the last two years. –  Peter Lang Feb 9 '10 at 22:55
SELECT id FROM table WHERE date + (365*2) <= sysdate;

Use SELECT id, date, other, columns ... if you need to get them at the same time.

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Guess this would return ids that have been produced more than 2 years ago, but not remove those that have not been produced within the last two years. Also be careful with leap years. –  Peter Lang Feb 9 '10 at 22:56

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