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We have code that will run if the user is idle for a certain amount of time. (doStuff resets a countdown)

Existing code in Prototype:

Event.observe(window, 'mousemove', function() { doStuff(); });
Event.observe(window, 'scroll', function() { doStuff(); });
Event.observe(window, 'click', function() { doStuff(); });
Event.observe(window, 'focus', function() { doStuff(); });
Event.observe(window, 'blur', function() { doStuff(); });
Event.observe(window, 'keypress', function() { doStuff(); });

Event.observe(document, 'mousemove', function() { doStuff(); });
Event.observe(document, 'scroll', function() { doStuff(); });
Event.observe(document, 'click', function() { doStuff(); });
Event.observe(document, 'focus', function() { doStuff(); });
Event.observe(document, 'blur', function() { doStuff(); });
Event.observe(document, 'keypress', function() { doStuff(); });

I am looking to replace it with this JQuery:

 $(document).ready(function() {
     $(document).bind("mousemove scroll click focus blur keypress", doStuff);
 });

It checks out when I test it, but can anyone confirm I don't have to do the document/window check, or that I didn't overlook anything else? Thanks.

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As for answer, i don't know, but if you can stack all the binds to one bind command... it's pretty awesome :] –  Adam Kiss Feb 9 '10 at 22:32
    
Yeah it appears to function correctly, which makes me happy. –  blu Feb 9 '10 at 22:33
    
I noticed focus and blur don't do call the function when I tab around the form, not sure if that even worked in the old way... –  blu Feb 9 '10 at 22:37
    
Almost certainly not, focus and blur don't bubble, you have to observe them on the individual elements. You can either do that once with a selector, or if you're adding/removing input elements jQuery's live method may help: api.jquery.com/live –  T.J. Crowder Feb 9 '10 at 23:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Close, this is a complete port (added window) and the Document ready test isn't needed:

 $([document, window]).bind("mousemove scroll click focus blur keypress", doStuff);

You can pass an array to the jQuery function so what you set up applies to more than one item. In this case, you already have references to window and document. This is how you can do it in one call.

However, I don't think all the original Prototype code was needed. For instance, focus and blur dont' apply to the document and click, mousemove and keypress isn't needed on the window.

This might be more what you want:

$(window).bind("focus blur scroll", doStuff);
$(document).bind("click mousemove keypress scroll", doStuff);

DOM Ready not needed: The DOM ready test is not needed because you already have access to document and window immediately. Waiting for DOM ready is needless.

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ok nice, thank you. –  blu Feb 9 '10 at 22:35
    
@blu just updated my answer with a little more detail. And I realized that $(document).ready was not needed. –  Doug Neiner Feb 9 '10 at 22:39
    
Thanks for the follow up. It works, I like it, question closed. –  blu Feb 9 '10 at 22:43

That Prototype code is...non-optimal to say the least, and not for any reason related to Prototype.

Your rewrite looks fine other than that you've dropped window. If not hooking the events on window is valid in jQuery, it's valid in Prototype.

A similar rewrite in Prototype making similar assumptions (but including window):

$w('mousemove scroll click focus blur keypress').each(function(evtname) {
    document.observe(evtname, doStuff);
    Event.observe(window, evtname, doStuff);
});

...and I wouldn't be surprised to find that even that's more verbose than it actually needs to be.

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