Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given the code below:

class Sample
{
 public static void Run()
 {
     int i = 1;
     Action<int> change = Increment();
     for (int x = 0; x < 5; x++ )
     {
         change(i);
         Console.WriteLine("value=" + i.ToString());
     }
 }

 public static Action<int> Increment()
 {
      return delegate(int i) { i++; };
 }

}

I get the answer:

value=1 value=1 value=1 value=1 value=1 value=1

Instead of 1, 2, 3 ... 6.

This is from an article on the net with links to clues but I can't work out why this is. Anyone have any ideas?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your parameter is being passed by value.

Writing i++ will change the value of i to a different int value (unlike a mutable type).
When you write i++ inside the delegate, you're changing the parameter to be equal to a different int value. However, this does not affect the local variable whose value was copied to the parameter.

To solve this, you need to make a delegate with a ref parameter. ref parameters are passed by reference. Therefore, when you change a ref int parameter to a different int value, you'll also change the local variable or field whose reference was passed as the parameter.

For more information, see here.

Since the Action delegates do not take ref parameters, you'll need to make your own delegate type, like this:

delegate void RefAction<T>(ref T param);
share|improve this answer
add comment

The datatype int is a primitive data type and hence a value-type as opposed to a reference type. This means that when you pass variable i to a function it isn't the actual variable that has been passed but instead a copy of the value. And therefore when the parameter is changed inside the function it is the local copy that has been changed and no the original variable.

If you are certain you want the function to be able to modify the value of the original variable, then you should add the ref keyword to the function parameter signature to tell the compiler that you want to pass the variable as a reference.

public void ChangeOriginal(ref int something)
{ something = something + 1;}

public void ChangeLocalCopy(int something)
{something = something + 1;}

I suggest you read up upon the stack vs the heap (value-type vs reference-type) since it's a very fundamental subject when programming.

share|improve this answer
2  
Your first paragraph applies to reference types as well. You're looking for the word immutable. –  SLaks Feb 9 '10 at 22:55
    
Good luck putting ref on the type parameter to Action<T>! –  Daniel Earwicker Feb 9 '10 at 23:12
add comment

the Action returns nothing. Its only incrementing the value passed in - not the reference to the orginal (as Slaks says). You can use a Func to do in this way.

class Sample
{
 public static void Run()
 {
     int i = 1;
     Func<int, int> change = Increment();
     for (int x = 0; x < 5; x++ )
     {
         i = change(i);
         Console.WriteLine("value=" + i.ToString());
     }
 }

 public static Func<int, int> Increment()
 {
      return delegate(int i) { return ++i; };
 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nope - the value of i++ is the original value of i before incrementing it. So your Increment just returns the same value it is passed. Try return ++i; instead, which returns the value after incrementing. Or to be clearer, just return i + 1; as you don't actually need the side-effect on i at all. –  Daniel Earwicker Feb 9 '10 at 23:10
    
of course. Thank you –  Preet Sangha Feb 10 '10 at 0:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.