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locally and on the server, I get different results with the same code.

Locally my results arrive as string, while on the server, the same code returns JSON object. Can anybody tell me why?

The javascript:

$.post(
    url, // Various urls of type '/users/add_secondary_email_ajax'
    data,
    function(res){
        if (typeof(res.success)=='undefined'){
            ModalManager.update_body_html(res);
        }else{
            callback_success(res);
        }
    }
);  

The CakePHP:

$this->autoRender = false; 
$this->RequestHandler->respondAs('json');
echo json_encode( array('success'=>true) ); // this arrives as string locally
return;     

I also had this working on my other computer, but not this one. Could it be some PHP settings?

Both computers have the same versions of Browser & CakePHP version (2.2.3).

I see differences in PHP and Apache versions. Could be settings also, but I don't know where to look.

Header On Broken Computer:

Request URL:localhost/alert_subscribers/subscribe_ajax
Request Method:POST
Status Code:200 OK

Request Headers 
Accept:*/*
Accept-Encoding:gzip,deflate,sdch
Accept-Language:en-US,en;q=0.8,bg;q=0.6
Connection:keep-alive
Content-Length:153
Content-Type:application/x-www-form-urlencoded; charset=UTF-8
Cookie:timezoneoffset=-120; viewedJobsGuest=[24]; __atuvc=13%7C11%2C46%7C12; CAKEPHP=dfbf9407743d43eb619a42aa5dbda735; toolbarDisplay=hide
Host:jobsadvent.dev
Origin:URL:localhost
Referer:URL:localhost/search
User-Agent:Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_9_2) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/33.0.1750.152 Safari/537.36
X-Requested-With:XMLHttpRequest

Form Data
data[title]:the title
data[email]:fake2@hotmail.com
data[alert]:1

Response Headers 
Connection:Keep-Alive
Content-Length:57
Content-Type:text/html
Date:Fri, 21 Mar 2014 10:19:06 GMT
Keep-Alive:timeout=5, max=100
Server:Apache/2.2.26 (Unix) DAV/2 PHP/5.4.24 mod_ssl/2.2.26 OpenSSL/0.9.8y
X-Powered-By:PHP/5.4.24

Header on Working computer

Request URL:http://domain.com/alert_subscribers/subscribe_ajax
Request Method:POST
Status Code:200 OK

Request Headers
Accept:*/*
Accept-Encoding:gzip,deflate,sdch
Accept-Language:en-US,en;q=0.8,bg;q=0.6
Connection:keep-alive
Content-Length:162
Content-Type:application/x-www-form-urlencoded; charset=UTF-8
Cookie:__atuvc=1%7C10%2C5%7C11; timezoneoffset=-120; CAKEPHP=sb3013ffk40h7o1jhsl8ulqfj4; toolbarDisplay=hide
Host:domain.com
Origin:http://domain.com
Referer:http://domain.com/search
User-Agent:Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_9_2) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/33.0.1750.152 Safari/537.36
X-Requested-With:XMLHttpRequest

Form Data 
data[title]:the title
data[email]:fake@hotmail.com
data[alert]:1

Response Headers 
Connection:close
Content-Length:57
Content-Type:application/json
Date:Fri, 21 Mar 2014 10:24:32 GMT
Server:Apache/2.2.15 (CentOS)
X-Powered-By:PHP/5.3.3

As for the routes.php file both are identical and contain the following line:

Router::parseExtensions('json');
share|improve this question
2  
Is it setting the correct application/json headers? –  ceejayoz Mar 11 at 16:52
    
Well, no - computer 1 it is application/json and in the other it is text/html. Both have the same code I posted up there. –  mgPePe Mar 11 at 17:06
    
What is the URL you are requesting. You forgot to mention that vital piece of information. Also: You should always mention the exact cakephp version you are using. –  mark Mar 11 at 17:12
    
I updated CakePHP version. Also added the url as a comment in the code block. –  mgPePe Mar 11 at 17:19
    
are both installations configured the same way? In particular routing and parse extensions? –  arilia Mar 21 at 19:49

7 Answers 7

This could be an issue with your apache settings:

The answer given on Apache sending incorrect response header for .js files suggests that you need something like

<FilesMatch \.php$>
    SetHandler application/x-httpd-php
</FilesMatch>

to get the right content types.

share|improve this answer
    
I was about to post the same, XD –  Chococroc Mar 26 at 20:02
    
Note that you should specify that this goes into the .htaccess (just in case they don't notice) –  Chococroc Mar 26 at 20:03

Refer to the jQuery.post() documentation. There is a fourth parameter (dataType) that you can use that will force jQuery to coerce the response to the correct datatype. You will need to set that equal to 'json' if you want an object back.

share|improve this answer
    
I am aware of dataType parameter, but on the other machine it works without it. Also in some cases I want server to return HTML rather than JSON. –  mgPePe Mar 11 at 17:03
    
Are you using the same browser/version on the other machine? –  watcher Mar 11 at 17:04
    
Yes, absolutely. PHP and browser versions as described in question. –  mgPePe Mar 11 at 17:06
    
given the problem statement, the issue is not from the client. your response is a fix and not the answer to his question. the reason why one's content type is application/json and the other text/html needs to be investigated. –  yomexzo Mar 25 at 15:10

Well, no - computer 1 it is application/json and in the other it is text/html. Both have the same code I posted up there.

There's your problem. jQuery uses the response's Content-Type header as a guide.

The CakePHP docs seem to indicate that $this->RequestHandler->respondAs() may work better if you pass it application/json rather than just json.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried this. It still returns string. Also it doesn't explain why it's different on the two computers :\ –  mgPePe Mar 12 at 7:12
    
Have you inspected the headers to see if it's being properly sent? Have you looked into differences between their web servers, not just PHP and browser? –  ceejayoz Mar 12 at 12:54
    
Can you give ideas as to what to look for on the web server? –  mgPePe Mar 13 at 14:57

JSON parsing should fix it.

$.post(
    url, // Various urls of type '/users/add_secondary_email_ajax'
    data,
    function(res){
        var result = JSON.parse(res);
        if (typeof(result.success)=='undefined'){
            ModalManager.update_body_html(res);
        }else{
            callback_success(res);
        }
    }
);  
share|improve this answer

I would set the contentType and dataType in your $.POST request.

$.POST({
    contentType : "application/x-www-form-urlencoded; charset=UTF-8",
    dataType : "json"
}) 
share|improve this answer
  1. when calling api: $.post(); "dataType" param should be set as "json".if it is not sepecfied, ajax will intelligent guessed (xml, json, script, text, html...).see manual here:

so how could the ajax guess the type of data ? There is a response header, "Content-Type:", by which the server tell the client what type is data. I think , ajax need this header to guess the data type. this is your broken computer's response:

Content-Type:text/html

and this is your working computer's response:

Content-Type:application/json

if you don't want to specified the param "dataType" of $.post(), you can change the response header, there must be many ways to change it, like this:

<?php
   header("Content-Type:application/json");
?>
share|improve this answer

That could be messy, but don't get worried until there's something to really worry about.

Statement of fact: one of your servers is behaving as expected and the other is not.

With the way that your error is manifesting, it sounds an awfully lot like you are not specifying your request specifically enough or your borked server is failing Content Negotiation.

There are two basic things that come into play here that you likely already know about: the requester's "Accept" header that allows the user agent to specify the content types that it is willing to receive and the server's ability to interpret that request and serve it appropriately. In absence of an explicitly set Accept header, text\html is the default response type.

Accept Header: RFC2616 Hypertext Transfer Protocol Section 14.1

The Accept request-header field can be used to specify certain media types which are acceptable for the response. Accept headers can be used to indicate that the request is specifically limited to a small set of desired types, as in the case of a request for an in-line image. The asterisk "" character is used to group media types into ranges, with "/*" indicating all media types and "type/*" indicating all subtypes of that type. The media-range MAY include media type parameters that are applicable to that range.

The accept headers that you set for each request indicate that you don't care what the server gives you. You might try setting your accept header to application/json and see if the "broken" server can interpret it and serve you. If that works, then it seems you're just running into an inconsistency with the way the servers are defaulting their response types. This even looks to be what you're asking for it to do. You said you accept all response types. If you don't specify something specific, the most reasonable type for a server to give you is text/html

MIME Types: RFC 2046 Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions

JSON: RFC 4627 The application/json Media Type for JavaScript Object Notation (JSON)

If setting the Accept header doesn't work for you, you're going to want to check your server's MIME type registration to make sure that [application\json] is registered and configured. That is not an esoteric configuration subject, so it should be available in any server's configuration documentation.

If neither of those approaches work, then the solution is to unplug the offending machine, carry it to the top of the building, and throw it as far as you can.

share|improve this answer

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