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I have question to the following task.

Consider an IA-32 system where the MMU supports a two level page table. The second level contains 1024 page table entries mapping to 4 KB page frames. Each page table entry (both levels) has a size of 4 bytes. The system only supports 4 KB page size.
We want to sequentially read consecutive 8 MB from virtual memory, starting with byte 0. We read one word at a time (4 bytes)
We have an 8 entry data TLB. How many memory accesses are needed to read the 8 MB of memory specified above?

Does it make a difference, if the TLB has 4 entries instead of 8?

So, we read sequentially. This means 8MB/4B = 2M memory accesses. We have a two level page table. Therefore, 2M + 2*2M = 6M memory accesses without TLB.

But I don't know how to calculate the memory accesses including a TLB.

Could anyone explain me that? That would be very helpful.

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"The system ... contains neither TLBs, ..." followed by "We have an 8 entry data TLB" makes this question rather inconsistent and not very answerable... –  twalberg Mar 11 '14 at 19:36
    
In the first case, there was no TLB, and the second case is with TLB...Sry, I will correct that –  user2965601 Mar 11 '14 at 19:39
    
So, it's done. Sry, again. –  user2965601 Mar 11 '14 at 19:40

1 Answer 1

Since the access pattern is a streaming access, each TLB entry will be used for one access to each four bytes for the entire page and never re-used. This means that each TLB entry will be reused 1023 times, so 1023 look-ups (2046 memory accesses) would be avoided per page. (Since there is no overlap of use of different translations and only perfectly localized reuse, a single entry data TLB would have equivalent performance to even a 2048-entry TLB.)

Consider the following description of what is happening for a two-entry direct-mapped data TLB (recognizing that the least significant 12 bits of the virtual address—the offset within the page—are ignored for the TLB and one bit of the virtual address is used to index into the TLB):

load 0x0100_0000; // TLB entry 0 tag != 0x0800 (page # 0x0_1000) [miss]
                  // 2 memory accesses to fill TLB entry 0
load 0x0100_0004; // TLB entry 0 tag == 0x0800 [hit]
load 0x0100_0008; // TLB entry 0 tag == 0x0800 [hit]
...               // 1020 TLB hits in TLB entry 0
load 0x0100_0ffc; // TLB entry 0 tag == 0x0800 [hit]; last word in page
load 0x0100_1000; // TLB entry 1 tag != 0x0800 (page # 0x0_1001) [miss]
                  // 2 memory accesses to fill TLB entry 1
load 0x0100_1004; // TLB entry 1 tag == 0x0800 [hit]
load 0x0100_1008; // TLB entry 1 tag == 0x0800 [hit]
...               // 1020 TLB hits in TLB entry 1
load 0x0100_1ffc; // TLB entry 1 tag == 0x0800 [hit]; last word in page
load 0x0100_2000; // TLB entry 0 tag (0x0800) != 0x0801 (page # 0x0_1002) [miss]
                  // 2 memory accesses to fill TLB entry 0
load 0x0100_2004; // TLB entry 0 tag == 0x0801 [hit]
load 0x0100_2008; // TLB entry 0 tag == 0x0801 [hit]
...               // 1020 TLB hits in TLB entry 0
load 0x0100_2ffc; // TLB entry 0 tag == 0x0801 [hit]; last word in page
load 0x0100_3000; // TLB entry 1 tag (0x0800) != 0x0801 (page # 0x0_1003) [miss)
                  // 2 memory accesses to fill TLB entry 1
load 0x0100_3004; // TLB entry 1 tag  == 0x0801 [hit]
load 0x0100_3008; // TLB entry 1 tag  == 0x0801 [hit]
...               // 1020 TLB hits in TLB entry 1
load 0x0100_3ffc; // TLB entry 1 tag  == 0x0801 [hit]; last word in page
...               // repeat the above 510 times
                  // then the last 4 pages of the 8 MiB stream
load 0x017f_c000; // TLB entry 0 tag (0x0bfd) != 0x0bfe (page # 0x0_17fc) [miss]
                  // 2 memory accesses to fill TLB entry 0
load 0x017f_c004; // TLB entry 0 tag == 0x0bfe [hit]
load 0x017f_c008; // TLB entry 0 tag == 0x0bfe [hit]
...               // 1020 TLB hits in TLB entry 0
load 0x017f_cffc; // TLB entry 0 tag == 0x0bfe [hit]; last word in page
load 0x017f_d000; // TLB entry 1 tag (0x0bfd) != 0x0bfe (page # 0x0_17fd) [miss]
                  // 2 memory accesses to fill TLB entry 1
load 0x017f_d004; // TLB entry 1 tag == 0x0bfe [hit]
load 0x017f_d008; // TLB entry 1 tag == 0x0bfe [hit]
...               // 1020 TLB hits in TLB entry 1
load 0x017f_dffc; // TLB entry 1 tag == 0x0bfe [hit]; last word in page
load 0x017f_e000; // TLB entry 0 tag (0x0bfe) != 0x0bff (page # 0x0_17fe) [miss]
                  // 2 memory accesses to fill TLB entry 0
load 0x017f_e004; // TLB entry 0 tag == 0x0bff [hit]
load 0x017f_e008; // TLB entry 0 tag == 0x0bff [hit]
...               // 1020 TLB hits in TLB entry 0
load 0x017f_effc; // TLB entry 0 tag == 0x0bff [hit]; last word in page
load 0x017f_f000; // TLB entry 1 tag (0x0bfe) != 0x0bff (page # 0x0_17ff) [miss]
                  // 2 memory accesses to fill TLB entry 1
load 0x017f_f004; // TLB entry 1 tag  == 0x0bff [hit]
load 0x017f_f008; // TLB entry 1 tag  == 0x0bff [hit]
...               // 1020 TLB hits in TLB entry 1
load 0x017f_fffc; // TLB entry 1 tag  == 0x0bff [hit]; last word in page

Each page is referenced 1024 times (once for each four byte element) in sequence and then is never referenced again.

(Now consider a design with four TLB entries and two entries caching page directory entries [each of which has the pointer to the page of page table entries]. Each cached PDE will be reused for 1023 page look-ups, reducing them to one memory access each. [If the 8 MiB streaming access was repeated as an inner loop and was 4 MiB aligned, a two-entry PDE cache would be fully warmed up after the first iteration and all subsequent page table look-ups would only require one memory reference.])

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Your solution is equal to the standard solution. The standard solution says, for every 1024 memory access, we need to refill the TLB entry, requiring two 2 memory accesses. But still, it's note completely clear. Could you maybe explain it again? What does the TLB save? We only got 8 entries. I can't see the you use of those 8 entries. Is it correct, the outer page table contains 1024 entries and the outer table functions as a directory for the inner table? The inner table contains 1024 entries? It is still not really clear. –  user2965601 Mar 12 '14 at 0:01
    
@user2965601 Did the addition of a trace summary help? While it is correct that each level of the page table contains 1024 entries, this is not important for your specific problem since it does not cache PDEs so a TLB miss must still first get the PDE and then the PTE. (x86's PAE and x86-64 use 64-bit entries, so there are only 512 per level [PAE's base table only has four entries to support a 32-bit virtual address space with 3 table levels and 4 KiB pages].) –  Paul A. Clayton Mar 12 '14 at 2:29
    
What does the TLB structure in that case look like? I mean, what does it contain, like only the entries of the second page or both pages? –  user2965601 Mar 15 '14 at 15:00
    
@user2965601 The example 2-entry TLB would contain translations for the previous page and the currently used page (except, of course, at the start of the loop when it is assumed to contain unrelated translations). The page translation two pages before the current one is forced out of the TLB when the current page translation is loaded into the TLB. (For an N entry TLB [N<2049] with LRU replacement [or direct-mapping], this streaming pattern will replace the N-previous translation with the translation for the current page.) –  Paul A. Clayton Mar 15 '14 at 16:01

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