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I need to find n!%1000000009. n is of type 2^k for k in range 1 to 20. The function I'm using is:

#define llu unsigned long long
#define MOD 1000000009

llu mulmod(llu a,llu b) // This function calculates (a*b)%MOD caring about overflows
{
    llu x=0,y=a%MOD;
    while(b > 0)
    {
        if(b%2 == 1)
        {
            x = (x+y)%MOD;
        }
        y = (y*2)%MOD;
        b /= 2;
    }
    return (x%MOD);
}

llu fun(int n)   // This function returns answer to my query ie. n!%MOD
{
    llu ans=1;
    for(int j=1; j<=n; j++)
    {
        ans=mulmod(ans,j);
    }
    return ans;
}

My demand is such that I need to call the function 'fun', n/2 times. My code runs too slow for values of k around 15. Is there a way to go faster?

EDIT: In actual I'm calculating 2*[(i-1)C(2^(k-1)-1)]*[((2^(k-1))!)^2] for all i in range 2^(k-1) to 2^k. My program demands (nCr)%MOD caring about overflows.

EDIT: I need an efficient way to find nCr%MOD for large n.

share|improve this question
    
Maybe there is a way to reduce the complexity ..? (2^k)! isn't exactly a "slow" growing function .. –  user2864740 Mar 11 at 18:53
    
Actually the complexity of my program depends mostly on the value of k. –  CPPCoder Mar 11 at 18:54
1  
Complexity as in growth rate; since it "runs too slow for values of k around 15", then maybe the algorithm is simply unfeasible to solve larger k's (say as it approaches 20). –  user2864740 Mar 11 at 18:55
1  
Is there a way to handle this overflow part better? –  CPPCoder Mar 11 at 19:03
2  
If what you denote nCr are the binomial coefficients, there is a better way than computing the factorials: use the recurrence nCr+1 = nCr.(n-r)/(r+1). Faster and requiring smaller numbers. –  Yves Daoust Mar 11 at 19:15

2 Answers 2

The mulmod routine can be speeded up by a large factor K.

1) '%' is overkill, since (a + b) are both less than N.
- It's enough to evaluate c = a+b; if (c>=N) c-=N;
2) Multiple bits can be processed at once; see optimization to "Russian peasant's algorithm"
3) a * b is actually small enough to fit 64-bit unsigned long long without overflow

Since the actual problem is about nCr mod M, the high level optimization requires using the recurrence

(n+1)Cr mod M = (n+1)nCr / (n+1-r) mod M.

Because the left side of the formula ((nCr) mod M)*(n+1) is not divisible by (n+1-r), the division needs to be implemented as multiplication with the modular inverse: (n+r-1)^(-1). The modular inverse b^(-1) is b^(M-1), for M being prime. (Otherwise it's b^(phi(_M_)), where phi is Euler's Totient function.)

The modular exponentiation is most commonly implemented with repeated squaring, which requires in this case ~45 modular multiplications per divisor.

If you can use the recurrence

nC(r+1) mod M = nCr * (n-r) / (r+1) mod M

It's only necessary to calculate (r+1)^(M-1) mod M once.

share|improve this answer
    
I couldn't understand what do you mean by "try to calculate func(2*a[+1]) from func(a)". Can you please explain? –  CPPCoder Mar 11 at 20:33
    
It's good if you can calculate f(N+1) from f(N) and N. But that is not nearly as efficient compared to the case when you can calculate f(2N) or f(2N+1) from f(N). When N is large, f(1000000) requires still one million iterations, first to f(999999) and so on. The second format needs a recursive call to f(500000), then to f(250000) and so on. Does that optimization or recurrence exist? I don't know. –  Aki Suihkonen Mar 11 at 20:38
    
Computing func(2*a) as a function of func(a) is certainly more ideal in general, but it wouldn't help in this case because he is already looping through all the values, meaning he needs to calculate f(0) -> f(1) -> f(2) -> f(3) -> ... -> f(n). It would be easier (and just as fast to run and easier to code) to simply work out f(a) as a function of f(a-1). –  GuyGreer Mar 12 at 1:54

Since you are looking for nCr for multiple sequential values of n you can make use of the following:

    (n+1)Cr = (n+1)! / ((r!)*(n+1-r)!)
    (n+1)Cr = n!*(n+1) / ((r!)*(n-r)!*(n+1-r))
    (n+1)Cr = n! / ((r!)*(n-r)!) * (n+1)/(n+1-r)
    (n+1)Cr = nCr * (n+1)/(n+1-r)

This saves you from explicitly calling the factorial function for each i.

Furthermore, to save that first call to nCr you can use:

    nC(n-1) = n //where n in your case is 2^(k-1).

EDIT:
As Aki Suihkonen pointed out, (a/b) % m != a%m / b%m. So the method above so the method above won't work right out of the box. There are two different solutions to this:

  1. 1000000009 is prime, this means that a/b % m == a*c % m where c is the inverse of b modulo m. You can find an explanation of how to calculate it here and follow the link to the Extended Euclidean Algorithm for more on how to calculate it.

  2. The other option which might be easier is to recognize that since nCr * (n+1)/(n+1-r) must give an integer, it must be possible to write n+1-r == a*b where a | nCr and b | n+1 (the | here means divides, you can rewrite that as nCr % a == 0 if you like). Without loss of generality, let a = gcd(n+1-r,nCr) and then let b = (n+1-r) / a. This gives (n+1)Cr == (nCr / a) * ((n+1) / b) % MOD. Now your divisions are guaranteed to be exact, so you just calculate them and then proceed with the multiplication as before. EDIT As per the comments, I don't believe this method will work.

Another thing I might try is in your llu mulmod(llu a,llu b)

    llu mulmod(llu a,llu b)
    {
        llu q = a * b;
        if(q < a || q < b) // Overflow!
        {
            llu x=0,y=a%MOD;
            while(b > 0)
            {
                if(b%2 == 1)
                {
                    x = (x+y)%MOD;
                }
                y = (y*2)%MOD;
                b /= 2;
            }
            return (x%MOD);
        }
        else
        {
            return q % MOD;
        }
    }

That could also save some precious time.

share|improve this answer
    
Writing (n+1)Cr = nCr * (n+1)/(n+1-r) % MOD will handle overflows I guess? –  CPPCoder Mar 11 at 19:55
    
@CPPCoder yes, since a%m * b%m == (a*b)%m –  GuyGreer Mar 11 at 21:06
    
No, it doesn't, because the '/' operator doesn't work as you expect under modular arithmetic. –  Aki Suihkonen Mar 13 at 7:47
    
@AkiSuihkonen yes, you're right. I've added a part on how to get around that. –  GuyGreer Mar 13 at 12:49
    
(nCr / a) is not necessary possible, but would have to be calculated with the method 1: nCr * a^(-1). –  Aki Suihkonen Mar 13 at 13:42

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