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What's the purpose of checking the value of $_post array from two text input fields like so:

$start = $end = ''; // i need to understand this line

if (isset($_POST['start'])) $start = $_POST['start'];
if (isset($_POST['end'])) $end= $_POST['end'];
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1  
its $_POST not $_post –  Dagon Mar 11 '14 at 20:09
    
That's right, thank you –  elkebirmed Mar 11 '14 at 20:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This just sets $start and $end to '' in one statement.

Then the following ifs check to see if something isset() before referencing them so that you don't get undefined variable notices.

So the first line is setting the default value in case the isset()s fail.

This accomplishes the same (and I prefer):

$start = isset($_POST['start']) ? $_POST['start'] : '';
$end   = isset($_POST['end']) ? $_POST['end'] : '';
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So it's simple, i just complicated it in my head, thank you :) –  elkebirmed Mar 11 '14 at 20:14

Because you need to find out if the variable has been defined. If it hasn't been defined, you are storing undefined variable and you will get an error (notice). That's why the check with isset() and storing empty string instead. Also $_post should capitalized ($_POST).

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$start = $end = ''; sets both variables to '': an empty string.

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You could say that $start equals end that equals ''. Therefore $start is '' too.

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$start = '';
$end   = '';

is same as:

$start = $end = ''; // i need to understand this line

That assign the value '' to $start and $end. All variable will have the last value of the assignation chain.

the purpose of: if (isset($_post['start'])) $start = $_post['start'];

if we look what that does :

[pseudo code]
    IF (I HAVE SOMETHING IN $_post['start'])
        THEN
            I CAN ASSIGN THIS VALUE TO $start

We do not want to assign an non-existing value to $start.

voila!

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