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I've come up with this hard to read if statement, and I can't figure out the best way I should format it's layout to make it more readable and do so in a C way.

if (((value == intMax) && (intMax != 0)) || // Deals with upper bound
    (value > (intMax/10)) ||
    ((value == (intMax/10)) && (digitAdjusted > digitLastIntMax)) ||
    ((value == intMin) && (intMin != 0)) || // Deals with lower bound
    (value < (intMin/10)) ||
    ((value == (intMin/10)) && (digitAdjusted < digitLastIntMin))) {

    // Some code
}

If this is an inappropriate use of SO, please let me know - I'll remove this question.

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4  
One of your OR's is bitwise instead of logical... –  pat Mar 11 '14 at 21:56
1  
There's no way to make that readable without delegating each of the major conditions to a function with a decent name. Course that's an opinion. –  Tony Hopkinson Mar 11 '14 at 21:57
    
Is there a reason you're using a bitwise or in line 3? I don't think it makes any difference here, thought there are situations where it will (foo() || bar() does not evaluate bar() if foo() returns true; foo() | bar() does). –  user3303729 Mar 11 '14 at 21:58
    
@pat that one got lost in the paste, thanks for noticing :) –  Morgan Wilde Mar 11 '14 at 21:59
    
@duedl0r if you could expand a bit into an answer, it'd be appreciated –  Morgan Wilde Mar 11 '14 at 22:00

5 Answers 5

Actually, since && precedes ||, the inner parenthesis aren't necessary - you can remove them.

Also: (intMin != 0) is the same as just intMax.

if ((value == intMax) && intMax || // Deals with upper bound
    (value > intMax/10) ||
    (value == intMax/10) && (digitAdjusted > digitLastIntMax) ||
    (value == intMin) && intMin || // Deals with lower bound
    (value < intMin/10) ||
    (value == intMin/10) && (digitAdjusted < digitLastIntMin)) {

    // Some code
}
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recent gcc versions are suggesting to add those parentheses, no? –  duedl0r Mar 11 '14 at 21:55
1  
Also, equality operators have lower precedence than division, so there goes some more parenthesis. –  jpw Mar 11 '14 at 21:56
    
Thanks, jpw! Removed them. –  Benesh Mar 11 '14 at 22:00
3  
Actually I think you can get rid of all of the nested parentheses, but possibly at the expense of clarity. I would restore the intMax != 0 test though, in the interest of readability. –  Paul R Mar 11 '14 at 22:01
up vote 3 down vote accepted

So this is what I've come up with following all the advice that I've received.

// Upper bound
maxReached              = (value == intMax) && (intMax != 0);
maxDivTenExceeded       = value > (intMax/10);
maxLastDigitExceeded    = (value == (intMax/10)) && (digitAdjusted > digitLastIntMax);
// Lower bound
minReached              = (value == intMin) && (intMin != 0);
minDivTenExceeded       = value < (intMin/10);
minLastDigitExceeded    = (value == (intMin/10)) && (digitAdjusted < digitLastIntMin);
// Stop conditions
stopMax                 = maxReached || maxDivTenExceeded || maxLastDigitExceeded;
stopMin                 = minReached || minDivTenExceeded || minLastDigitExceeded;


// Prevent integer overflow
if (stopMax || stopMin) {
    // Code
}
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1  
Much better, now hide it all in another class and write some good unit tests. –  Tony Hopkinson Mar 11 '14 at 22:48

I would put each of the clauses separated by || into functions that return a boolean value.

if ( test1(value, intMax) ||  // ((value == intMax) && (intMax != 0)) || // Deals with upper bound
     test2(value, intMax) ||  // (value > (intMax/10)) ||
     test3(value, intmax, digitAdjusted, digitLastIntMax) || // ((value == (intMax/10)) && (digitAdjusted > digitLastIntMax)) |
     test4(value, intMin) //     ((value == intMin) && (intMin != 0)) || // Deals with lower bound
     test5(value, intMin) || // (value < (intMin/10)) ||
     test6(value, intMin, digitAdjusted, digitLastIntMin) //((value == (intMin/10)) && (digitAdjusted < digitLastIntMin))
)
{
// Some code
}
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I did think of that, but wouldn't it too verbose? –  Morgan Wilde Mar 11 '14 at 21:57
    
I think it will bring clarity to the code at the coast of a little bit of verbosity. –  R Sahu Mar 11 '14 at 21:58
1  
@MorganWilde Too verbose? The aim is comprehensibility. Code is written for coders. For instance while I understand every line of your code, I don't have clue what its for, in a few weeks time, you'll be in the same position. –  Tony Hopkinson Mar 11 '14 at 22:42
    
@TonyHopkinson I do appreciate your argument, that's why I'm asking this question. Still, I can have my reservations and check if they're well-grounded (verbosity in this instance). –  Morgan Wilde Mar 11 '14 at 22:48
1  
As a mainly maintenance coder for most of my career, rest assured that people who go for terse (succinct is more than okay) are not high on my Yuletide greetings list. :) –  Tony Hopkinson Mar 11 '14 at 22:51

If you want to make it more readable, use nested ifs and a good explanation in comments as to what each stage is doing. There's not much practical benefit to doing it all on one line and it certainly does seem unreadable.

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1  
What / how comments are a last resort in a high level language like Java and nested ifs should be used sparingly, even with a wide screen monitor.. –  Tony Hopkinson Mar 11 '14 at 22:46

Lining things up vertically helps a little bit, but the real question is, "What are the requirements that you're trying to implement?". It sort of looks like your converting an input string to an integer while trying to avoid overflow, but the intMin checks make no sense in that case. A little more context might help to sort this out.

if (((value == intMax) && (intMax != 0)) || (value > (intMax/10)) || ((value == (intMax/10)) && (digitAdjusted > digitLastIntMax)) ||
    ((value == intMin) && (intMin != 0)) || (value < (intMin/10)) || ((value == (intMin/10)) && (digitAdjusted < digitLastIntMin)) )

Note that vertical alignment would have made the bitwise OR vs. logical OR errors immediately obvious.

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