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I'm playing around with a 'fluent calculator' exercise, and I've run into an issue I don't understand. If I define some test methods independently in irb (the first chunk of code), they work, but if I define them inside of a class, I start getting NoMethodError, even though everything about the methods and what they return seems identical. What is it about defining these methods in a class that would cause them to behave differently?

Defined independently:

1.9.3p484 :097 >   def one
1.9.3p484 :098?>       if self.is_a? String
1.9.3p484 :099?>           instance_eval "#{self} 1"
1.9.3p484 :100?>         else
1.9.3p484 :101 >             1
1.9.3p484 :102?>         end
1.9.3p484 :103?>     end
 => nil 
1.9.3p484 :104 >   def two
1.9.3p484 :105?>       if self.is_a? String
1.9.3p484 :106?>           instance_eval "#{self} 2"
1.9.3p484 :107?>         else
1.9.3p484 :108 >             2
1.9.3p484 :109?>         end
1.9.3p484 :110?>     end
 => nil 
1.9.3p484 :111 >   def plus
1.9.3p484 :112?>       "#{self} +"
1.9.3p484 :113?>     end 
 => nil 
1.9.3p484 :114 > one.class
 => Fixnum 
1.9.3p484 :115 > two.class
 => Fixnum 
1.9.3p484 :116 > plus.class
 => String 
1.9.3p484 :117 > one.plus.two
 => 3 

Defined inside class Calc:

1.9.3p484 :024 > class Calc
1.9.3p484 :025?>     
1.9.3p484 :026 >       def one
1.9.3p484 :027?>         if self.is_a? String
1.9.3p484 :028?>             instance_eval "#{self} 1"
1.9.3p484 :029?>           else
1.9.3p484 :030 >               1
1.9.3p484 :031?>           end
1.9.3p484 :032?>       end
1.9.3p484 :033?>     
1.9.3p484 :034 >       def two
1.9.3p484 :035?>         if self.is_a? String
1.9.3p484 :036?>             instance_eval "#{self} 2"
1.9.3p484 :037?>           else
1.9.3p484 :038 >               2
1.9.3p484 :039?>           end
1.9.3p484 :040?>       end
1.9.3p484 :041?>     
1.9.3p484 :042 >       def plus
1.9.3p484 :043?>         "#{self} +"
1.9.3p484 :044?>       end      
1.9.3p484 :045?>   end
 => nil 
1.9.3p484 :046 > Calc.new.one.class
 => Fixnum 
1.9.3p484 :047 > Calc.new.two.class
 => Fixnum 
1.9.3p484 :048 > Calc.new.plus.class
 => String 
1.9.3p484 :049 > Calc.new.one.plus.two
NoMethodError: undefined method `plus' for 1:Fixnum
    from (irb):49
    from /Users/miles/.rvm/rubies/ruby-1.9.3-p484/bin/irb:12:in `<main>'
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Hint: look at self.class

When you define it in the global namespace you are actually defining methods on the Object class, from which all other objects inherit, so Fixnum and String inherit your new methods. Once you put them into a class, Fixnum and String no longer have those methods defined.

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Very clear explanation, thank you. –  elements Mar 11 at 22:51
    
I should also mention, defining things in Object is almost never a good idea in larger programs. This puts too much extra functionality into every object, which pretty much defeats the whole purpose of objects. –  DGM Mar 12 at 3:15
1  
Yeah, I realized I was going to have to scrap it once I read these answers. I ended up storing all the calculation info in an instance variable and having each method return self instead of Strings or Fixnums. –  elements Mar 13 at 18:17
    
That's just what I was thinking of as a solution. :) –  DGM Mar 14 at 20:10

In the first example, you are declaring "plus" in the global namespace, so it also applicable to Fixnum. In the second example, it is declared inside the class, so it's only applicable to objects of that class. However, Fixnum is not the same as your class.

When calling Calc.new.one, you are getting a Fixnum (because of one). So you can't call .plus on that.

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Ah-ha! That makes so much sense now. I'm accepting the other answer though, since it goes into a bit more detail that other people viewing the question might benefit from. –  elements Mar 11 at 22:50

At every point you use a period (dot .), you should think of what is getting returned:

Calc.new = a new Calc object (by invoking the new method on Calc returns a Calc object)

Calc.new.one = the one method called on the Calc object (returns a 1 which is a Fixnum object)

Calc.new.one.plus = the plus method called on 1 -> There is no plus method defined on the 1 or Fixnum object, so you have an undefined method error.

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