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struct Node {
    int value;
    Node* next;
    ~Node() {
        delete next;
    }
};

Node* deleteList(Node* p) {
    if(p == nullptr) return nullptr;
    Node* pNext = p->next;
    delete p;
    return deleteList(pNext);
}

the compiler said something about bad access. I tried to set breakpoint to debug it. If the linked list is [3, 2, 1], it first delete the 3, then 2 and 1, and then jump back to 2, then encountered exception. Can someone tell me what is the problem?

share|improve this question
    
With the exception of the use of nullptr, wouldn't this be more of a C problem, rather than C++? (I don't recall if nullptr is valid in the newer C standard). Theoretically, if you are using C++, why would you not use std::list or one of the other STL containers? – Will Mar 12 '14 at 4:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the linked list is: [3, 2, 1], when you call deleteList, the following things happen:

  1. p = 3, pNext = 2, 3 was deleted by delete p; Then the destructor was called, so delete next would delete 2 and 1 recursively.

  2. then after delete p in deleteList function, deleteList(pNext) was called again, so this time: p = 2, pNext = 1, since 2 was already deleted in the previous step, it would corrupt when you call delete p again.

So please remove the delete next; in ~Node().

Actually I don't see reason why deleteList should be used, because it would always return nullptr and delete all the nodes. So why not remove the deleteList function, and keep the delete next; in ~Node(). You can delete the created Node object directly.

And of course the best way to do this task is: std::list.

share|improve this answer

The destructor for the Node struct already calls delete on "next". Therefore, it goes to "next" and calls its destructor, and so on. All nodes following p in the linked list will then be deleted just by calling delete p; (where p is a Node*).

I recommend you get rid of the Node's destructor to prevent this chain destruction from occurring.

struct Node {
    int value;
    Node* next;
};

As a side note, while I don't know the rest of your code I don't see a reason as to why deleteList(Node* p) should return a Node* (as it will always be nullptr, no interesting results are returned).

void deleteList(Node* p)
{
    if(p == nullptr) return;
    Node* pNext = p->next;
    delete p;
    deleteList(pNext);
}
share|improve this answer

I would wager a guess that you are experiencing delete being called multiple times on an instance that has already been deleted. When you call delete p;, p's destructor is getting called, and it is deleting the next node in the list. You then recursively call deleteList, passing it the node that was just deleted by p's destructor, making the pointer you are holding invalid.

What you need to do is determine whether the Node owns the Node that follows it in the list (that is, is it responsible for cleaning it up), or will some outside code take care of that. You cannot do both.


Edit:

As an aside, what you really want is not to have a recursive delete function, but rather a loop within your deleteList function. Something like ...

struct Node {
  int value;
  Node* next;
};

// Loop in the function; recursion not required, and no return value.
void delete_list(Node* n)
{
  Node* tmp;
  while (nullptr != n) {
    tmp = n->next;
    delete n;
    n = tmp;
  }
}

In this case, the Node instance does not own its sibling Node (Node.next), and takes no responsibility for deallocating it; that is up to the delete_list function.

share|improve this answer
    
but before I delete p, I pass the next to pNext. So deleteList can actually get the next node, isn't it? – Joshua Mar 12 '14 at 4:46
    
what it is receiving is that next node, but p's destructor delete's it on you, so that pointer you store in pNext is no longer valid - it points at memory that has already been deleted. – Will Mar 12 '14 at 4:47
    
I get the impression that you think the pointers are reference-counted (that is, it isn't actually deleted until the last reference is deleted). That would be the case in Java or C#, for example, but not C++. There are libraries that provide similar support, and there are STL classes that give you reference-counted shared pointers, but using standard, run-of-the-mill pointers do not work that way. – Will Mar 12 '14 at 4:50

Remove the line delete next; from the destructor of Node.

share|improve this answer
    
isn't then there is memory leak because next in Node wont be deleted? – Joshua Mar 12 '14 at 4:44
    
@Joshua, I believe you already got your answer from feihu. – R Sahu Mar 12 '14 at 4:53
    
@RSahu: actually he got it from you and I, but for some reason, feihu was awarded the best answer, even though he answered what we both already said almost 10 minutes before he did. – Will Mar 12 '14 at 4:56
    
@Will, I can understand why feihu's answer was chosen as the best answer. My answer was not too explanatory even though it was correct. While your answer has more explantion, feihu's answer is easier to follow the sequence of events that leads to the item containing 2 being deleted twice. – R Sahu Mar 12 '14 at 5:04
    
@RSahu: I guess the visual was what the OP was looking for. My point was that he came along after we answered and apparently didn't take much effort into answering the question himself. He even edited his response to include what I commented to the original question above (the use of std::list). I mean, really? Maybe I'm just being nit-picky; I get that way at this hour of the night/morning. :) – Will Mar 12 '14 at 5:16

I think there may be two choices for you. first, as R Sahu said, remove the delete next in destructor.

struct Node {
    int value;
    Node* next;
};

Node* deleteList(Node* p) {
    if(p == nullptr) return nullptr;
    Node* pNext = p->next;
    delete p;
    return deleteList(pNext);
}

second, just delete the head node of the link in deleteList, but not delete nodes recursively.

struct Node {
    int value;
    Node* next;
    Node() : value(0), next(nullptr)
    {}
    ~Node() {
        if (next != nullptr)
        {
            delete next;
        }
    }
};

Node* deleteList(Node* p) {
    if (p != nullptr)
    {
        delete p;
    }
    return nullptr;  // in fact your code always return nullptr. so it just return nullptr here.
}
share|improve this answer
    
One drawback to this approach is that deleteList is actually a misnomer; it should be called deleteNode, as you are only deleting a single node, not the entire list. – Will Mar 12 '14 at 5:00

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