Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

After I upgraded to latest stable node and npm, I tried npm install moment --save. It saves the entry in the package.json with the caret(^) prefix. Previously, it was a tilde(~) prefix.

  1. Why are these changes made in npm?
  2. What is the difference between tilde(~) and caret(^)?
  3. What is the advantages over others?
share|improve this question
1  
FYI you can prevent prefixes or use a custom one by doing: npm config set save-prefix=''. (Stick ~ in the quotes if that's what you prefer.) I personally do this and shrinkwrap for things in production. – fncomp Jan 22 '15 at 9:48
3  
All the nitty gritty details of how tilde and caret work and differences: github.com/npm/node-semver#tilde-ranges-123-12-1 – Jeffrey Martinez Oct 13 '15 at 21:31
up vote 965 down vote accepted

In the simplest terms, the tilde matches the most recent minor version (the middle number). ~1.2.3 will match all 1.2.x versions but will miss 1.3.0.

The caret, on the other hand, is more relaxed. It will update you to the most recent major version (the first number). ^1.2.3 will match any 1.x.x release including 1.3.0, but will hold off on 2.0.0.

http://fredkschott.com/post/2014/02/npm-no-longer-defaults-to-tildes/

share|improve this answer
12  
~ allows the right most version segment to increment above the given value. Consequently, ~1.2.3 will accept versions 1.2.3 through to 1.2.Nth. While ~1.2 will accept 1.2.* through to 1.Nth.* – George Jun 14 '14 at 16:28
84  
Just use 0.0.x instead of ~0.0.0. The first is less obscure. – Fagner Brack Oct 14 '14 at 3:36
73  
Posting here to hopefully catch people that don't quite think this through, but both ^ and ~ assumes you can trust minor and point releases from your dependencies. If you are publishing a library and want other people to trust you, DO NOT BLINDLY ACCEPT DOWNSTREAM DEPENDENCIES. A bad dot release from your dependency can cause a chain reaction upstream, and will have people knocking at YOUR door when things go pear shaped. This is another huge reason to use npm shrinkwrap on your production code. – tehfoo Feb 9 '15 at 18:33
7  
I would argue automatic dependencies should never exist in the first place. Maven is older in the Java realm and doesn't have it, never needed. Learn with the elders. – Fagner Brack Mar 24 '15 at 6:47
26  
This is misleading for ^. It says that ^ will update you to the most recent major version, when in actuality it updates you to the most recent minor version. i.e: - ^1.2.3 := >=1.2.3 <2.0.0 - ^0.2.3 := >=0.2.3 <0.3.0 - ^0.0.3 := >=0.0.3 <0.0.4 – prasanthv Jul 31 '15 at 19:51

I would like to add the official npmjs documentation as well which describes all methods for version specificity including the ones referred to in the question -

https://www.npmjs.org/doc/files/package.json.html

https://docs.npmjs.com/misc/semver#x-ranges-12x-1x-12-

  • ~version "Approximately equivalent to version" See npm semver - Tilde Ranges & semver (7)
  • ^version "Compatible with version" See npm semver - Caret Ranges & semver (7)
  • version Must match version exactly
  • >version Must be greater than version
  • >=version etc
  • <version
  • <=version
  • 1.2.x 1.2.0, 1.2.1, etc., but not 1.3.0
  • http://sometarballurl (this may be the URL of a tarball which will be downloaded and installed locally
  • * Matches any version

The above list is not exhaustive. Other version specifiers include GitHub urls and GitHub user repo's, local paths and packages with specific npm tags

share|improve this answer
21  
There is also the option "latest". – markau Mar 20 '15 at 5:08

~ fixes major and minor numbers. It is used when you're ready to accept bug-fixes in your dependency, but don't want any potentially incompatible changes.

^ fixes the major number only. It is used when you're closely watching your dependencies and are ready to quickly change your code if minor release will be incompatible.

In addition to that, ^ is not supported by old npm versions, and should be used with caution.

So, ^ is a good default, but it's not perfect. I suggest to carefully pick and configure the semver operator that is most useful to you.

share|improve this answer
5  
not true: Caret Ranges ^1.2.3 ^0.2.5 ^0.0.4. Allows changes that do not modify the left-most non-zero digit in the [major, minor, patch] tuple. In other words, this allows patch and minor updates for versions 1.0.0 and above, patch updates for versions 0.X >=0.1.0, and no updates for versions 0.0.X. docs.npmjs.com/misc/semver#caret-ranges-1-2-3-0-2-5-0-0-4 – rofrol Oct 11 '15 at 16:08

~ : Reasonably close to

   ~1.1.5: 1.1.0 <= accepted < 1.2.0

^: Compatible with

   ^1.1.5: 1.1.5 <= accepted < 2.0.0

   ^0.1.3: 0.1.3 <= accepted < 0.2.0

   ^0.0.4: 0.0.4 <= accepted < 0.1.0
share|improve this answer
6  
^0.1.3: 0.1.3 <= accepted < 1.0.0 instead, no? – kytwb Nov 4 '14 at 8:11
8  
@kytwb - no. In the special case of zeroth-release version numbers, the carat is equivalent to the tilde. Thus ^0.1.3 only accepts versions 0.1.x and will not accept 0.2.0, even though that's a minor increment. This behavior is equivalent to ~0.1.3. The reasoning behind this behavior is due to the fact that zeroth-release packages are still considered unstable; in the words of semver.org, #4, "anything may change at any time" (including backwards-incompatible changes). – chharvey Feb 25 '15 at 20:45

Npm allows installing newer version of a package than the one specified. Using tilde (~) gives you bug fix releases and caret (^) gives you backwards compatible new functionality as well.

The problem is old versions usually don't receive bug fixes that much, so npm uses caret (^) as the default for --save.

semver table

According to: "Semver explained - why there's a caret (^) in my package.json?".

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent answer!! Best explanation! – higuaro Oct 8 '15 at 8:45
    
What about ^0.2.5? from docs.npmjs.com/misc/semver#caret-ranges-1-2-3-0-2-5-0-0-4: Caret Ranges ^1.2.3 ^0.2.5 ^0.0.4. Allows changes that do not modify the left-most non-zero digit in the [major, minor, patch] tuple. In other words, this allows patch and minor updates for versions 1.0.0 and above, patch updates for versions 0.X >=0.1.0, and no updates for versions 0.0.X. – rofrol Oct 11 '15 at 16:18
    
@rofrol any version before 1.0.0 is considered unstable and these rules don't apply – pspi Nov 4 '15 at 9:35
    
So your explanation isn't complete – rofrol Nov 4 '15 at 10:22
1  
@rofrol yeah, omitting for readability is good sometimes, chances of having anything below 1.0.0 for a dependency in package json are pretty low. see also 20/80 principle, is a great rule for focusing on what matters – pspi Nov 4 '15 at 16:42

Semver

<major>.<minor>.<patch>-beta.<beta> == 1.2.3-beta.2

^ (caret)

  • find left-most non-zero - freeze it
  • find sublevel (0 if none) - set as starting number

~ (tilde)

  • find right-most non-zero (0 if none)
  • set as starting number
  • freeze super levels

 

^semver~  // graphically to help you remember

Avoid numbering from 0, because with ^ as default in npm, your users won't get minor updates or even patches!

Missing major, minor, patch or specifying beta without number, is the same as x (any) for the missing level.

.. in the right column is range in my notation: 1.2..*.3 means 1.x.3, where x >= 2 and initial patch is 3.

Allow major-level changes

*                 *
"" (empty string) *
                  1..*              // Not possible with semver? Maybe 1 - *?

Allow minor-level changes

~0 (0)            0.0..*            // No minor and no non-zero, allow minor-level changes
0.2               0.2..*            // Can't do that with carret or tilde 
~1 (1, ^1)        1.0..*
^1.2              1.2..*
^1.2.3            1.2..*.3          // Start from 1.2.3
^1.2.3-beta.4     1.2..*.3-beta.4   // Start from 1.2.3-beta.4

Allow patch-level changes

^0.0 (0.0)        0.0.0..*          // No patch and no non-zero, allow patch-level changes
~0.2              0.2.0..*
~1.2              1.2.0..*
~0.2.3 (^0.2.3)   0.2.3..*
~1.2.3            1.2.3..*

Allow beta-level changes

~1.2.3-beta.4     1.2.3-beta.4..*
^0.0.3-beta       0.0.3-beta.0..*, 0.0.3-pr.0..*
^0.0.3-beta.4     0.0.3-beta.4..*, 0.0.3-pr.4..*

Disallow changes

1.2.3             1.2.3
^0.0.3 (0.0.3)    0.0.3
share|improve this answer

^ is 1.[any].[any] (latest minor version)
~ is 1.2.[any] (latest patch)

A great read is this blog post on how semver applies to npm
and what they're doing to make it match the semver standard
http://blog.npmjs.org/post/98131109725/npm-2-0-0

share|improve this answer
    
not true: Caret Ranges ^1.2.3 ^0.2.5 ^0.0.4. Allows changes that do not modify the left-most non-zero digit in the [major, minor, patch] tuple. In other words, this allows patch and minor updates for versions 1.0.0 and above, patch updates for versions 0.X >=0.1.0, and no updates for versions 0.0.X. docs.npmjs.com/misc/semver#caret-ranges-1-2-3-0-2-5-0-0-4 – rofrol Oct 11 '15 at 16:07

Hat matching is broken because it wont update ^0.1.2 to 0.2.0. The rule is: always version your package skipping the 0.x.x version range and you'll get consistent behaviour

Given a version number MAJOR.MINOR.PATCH, increment the:

MAJOR version when you make incompatible API changes,
MINOR version when you add functionality in a backwards-compatible manner, and
PATCH version when you make backwards-compatible bug fixes.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.