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The line *array[cnt] = thing causes a seg fault and I don't know why. Any ideas to fix this?

long *Load_File(char *Filename, int *Size)
{
    FILE *fp;

    if((fp = fopen(Filename,"r")) == NULL)
    {
        printf("Cannot open file.\n");
        exit(-1);
    }

    fscanf(fp,"%d",Size);

    int cnt = 0;
    int items = *Size;
    long * array[items];
    int thing;

    while (!feof(fp))
    {
        fscanf(fp,"%d",&thing);
        *array[cnt] = thing;
        cnt++;
    }

    fclose(fp);

    return *array;
}
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2  
Do you understand why this is wrong: long *pl; *pl = 42;? –  Alok Singhal Feb 10 '10 at 4:19
    
OMG, This code has too many issues to be pointed out. Anyway, I will let you know the things you need to learn (immediately), (1) Scope of variables (2) Pointers and Arrays, –  Alphaneo Feb 10 '10 at 5:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
long * array[items];

is declaring an array of pointers to long data type. But these pointers are not pointing to anything meaningful.

When you do

*array[cnt] = thing;

you are dereferencing the pointer which is incorrect since they dont point to anything meaningful.

You can dynamically allocate the memory for the array as:

long * array = (long*) malloc(size(long) * items);

and then do:

while (!feof(fp)) {
        fscanf(fp,"%d",&arr[cnt++]);
    }

and then return the array as:

return array;
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You need to make sure your file has a number "items" followed by at max those many numbers. –  codaddict Feb 10 '10 at 4:26

First off, that code can't compile. Since items isn't a constant, it can't be used to size the array. How did you get it to even run, let alone seg-fault? Aside from that, and in addition to the problem @codaddict highlights...

feof won't return true until fscanf fails. This will push you past the end of the array. Better to write this:

while (cnt < items && fscanf(fp, "%d", &thing))
{
    /* ... */
}

WRT the array, I think you intended this:

long *array = malloc(sizeof(long)*items);
/* ... */
    array[cnt] = thing;
/* ... */
return array;
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While everything else you said is correct, even return array; is wrong because array is local to the function, so you can't return &array[0];. –  Alok Singhal Feb 10 '10 at 4:27
    
You /can/ compile it using variable length arrays. However, as ergosys reminded us, you should never return a pointer to your stack (which includes VLAs). Alok, return array is not wrong. Since he malloced, array is pointing to heap memory, which is fine. –  Matthew Flaschen Feb 10 '10 at 4:55
    
@Matthew, thanks for pointing that out. I'm a pre-C99 programmer. –  Marcelo Cantos Feb 10 '10 at 23:59

Change

long * array[items];

to

long * array = (long *) malloc(sizeof(long) * items);

We dynamically allocate memory for items longs and store the address in our array variable. Your syntax means "An array of items pointers to long". The new syntax means "a pointer to a long" (the first of a dynamic "array").

Change

    *array[cnt] = thing;

to

    array[cnt] = thing;

We put the latest read long in the correct spot.

Change

return *array;

to

return array;

We return array, which is the same as a pointer to the first long in the memory we allocated. Be sure to free it later.

EDIT:

Thanks to ergosys for reminding me that VLAs are allocated on the stack. Removed suggested changes to function header.

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2  
All good except the last part! Returning a pointer to stack memory is bad juju. –  ergosys Feb 10 '10 at 4:29
    
the function header is predefined and im not allowed to change it –  pythonicate Feb 10 '10 at 4:36
1  
What ergosys said, but it also looks like he's supposed to be returning the Size value that he reads to a variable provided by the caller (i.e. Size appears to be an [out] parameter). Filename is probably an [in], although it's not const, so who knows. The return value presumably is an array of longs, so I assume that the expectation was for the function to allocate the array on the heap and return the pointer. –  Scott Smith Feb 10 '10 at 4:41

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