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I have a form that contains 3 div for addresses (Main Address, Secondary Address, Add Address). Each div contains the following elements (text_field): Name, Address, Phone. Depending on the scenario, I want to edit a text field for a specific div.

So I have this scenario:

Given I am at the form for editing addresses
When the div "main address" is visible
Then fill the "name" element for the "main address" div
And erase the "address" for the "main address" div

And the following steps definitions:

Then(/^fill the "([^"]+)" element for the "([^"]+)" div$/) do |element, div|
   on_page(AddressPage).fill_element element div
end

And now the part I'm not sure about - the Address Page

class AddressPage
  include PageObject
  include DataMagic
  div(:main_address, :id => 'main_address')
  div(:secondary_address, :id => 'secondary_address')
  div(:add_address, :id => 'add_address')

  def fill_element(element, div)
    current_div = self.send("#{div}_element")
    # now the part I don't know how to do:
    current_element = div.search_within(current_div, element)
    fill_with_correct_data current_element
  end

  def search_within(div, element)
    # How to do this?
  end
end

How can I do this so that I don't have to define all the elements for all the divs (the number of div is dynamic)? What I need to know is if there's a way to search an element to be inside another one.

Thanks :)


Edit The html will look something like this:

<div id='main_address'>
    <input id='name'>
    </input>
    <input id='address'>
    </input>
    <input id='phone'>
    </input>
</div>
<div id='secondary_address'>
    <input id='name'>
    </input>
    <input id='address'>
    </input>
    <input id='phone'>
    </input>
</div>
<div id='add_address'>
    <input id='name'>
    </input>
    <input id='address'>
    </input>
    <input id='phone'>
    </input>
</div>

Second Edit The point was to also declare this:

select_list(:name, :id => 'name')
select_list(:address, :id => 'address')
select_list(:phone, :id => 'phone')

#Is this possible?
current_name_element = main_address.name
#?
#Also, at the end the point is to call the Datamagic populate_page_with method
populate_page_with data_for 'new_user'

Where the 'default.yml" looks like this:

new_user:
  name: ~first_name
  address: ~address
  phone: ~phone

Where I can choose which div this will be filled. Is this possible?

share|improve this question
    
Just to clarify, is this Cheezy's page object gem? Can you also share the relevant portion of the html? –  Justin Ko Mar 12 at 13:48
    
Justin, yes, the Cheezy Page Object gem. I'll edit it and add the html. –  Tiago Mar 12 at 14:08

1 Answer 1

You can find an element within an element by using the element locators. These methods use the same type of locator you would use in the accessor methods.

For example, for a given current_div, you could get its related text fields:

current_element = current_div.text_field_element(:id => 'name')
current_element = current_div.text_field_element(:id => 'address')
current_element = current_div.text_field_element(:id => 'phone')

Note: You might need to change these locators. Presumably these ids are not exactly correct since ids should be unique on the page.

Applying the above to your page object, you could define the fill_element method as:

def fill_element(element, div)
  current_div = self.send("#{div}_element")   
  current_element = current_div.text_field_element(:id => element)

  # I assume this is a method you have already
  fill_with_correct_data current_element
end

Calling the method would be like:

page.fill_element('name', 'main_address')
page.fill_element('address', 'secondary_address')
page.fill_element('phone', 'add_address')

Update - Created Scoped Locator:

This seems a bit messy, but is the best I can think of given the current implementation of the page object gem. I think there are some backlog feature requests for the gem that would make this cleaner.

What you could do is:

class AddressPage
    include PageObject

    class ScopedLocator
        def initialize(name, page_object)
            @name = name
            @page = page_object
        end

        def populate_with(data)
            scoped_data = Hash[data.map {|k, v| ["#{@name}_#{k}", v] }]
            @page.populate_page_with scoped_data
        end

        def method_missing(m, *args)  
            @page.send("#{@name}_#{m}", *args)
        end
    end

    ['main_address', 'secondary_address', 'add_address'].each do |name|
        define_method(name) { ScopedLocator.new(name, self) }
        text_field("#{name}_name"){ div_element(:id => name).text_field_element(:id => 'name') }
        text_field("#{name}_address"){ div_element(:id => name).text_field_element(:id => 'address') }
        text_field("#{name}_phone"){ div_element(:id => name).text_field_element(:id => 'phone') }
    end  
end

This does 2 things:

  1. It will create the normal accessors for each address. For example, it creates a :main_address_name, :main_address_address and :main_address_phone (and again for the other address types).
  2. It creates a method, eg main_address that delegates actions to the normal accessors. This is to give the main_address.populate_with syntax.

With this page object, you could do the populate_with for a given address section:

page.main_address.populate_with data_for 'new_user'
page.secondary_address.populate_with data_for 'new_user'
page.add_address.populate_with data_for 'new_user'

As well as be able to update individual fields of an address. For example:

page.main_address.name = 'user'
share|improve this answer
    
Well, ideally there would be no repeated ids, but in this webpage there are. I didn't know the nested elements method. Ok, I'm going to try that! Thanks :) –  Tiago Mar 12 at 15:28
    
I just edited the question. Can you give it a look? :) –  Tiago Mar 12 at 17:58
    
If the second edit, how would populate_page_with know which address (ie main, secondary, add) to update? Is it meant to populate all the addresses or just a specific address? If the latter, would you be fine with a main_address.populate_with data_for 'new_user'? –  Justin Ko Mar 12 at 18:10
    
Justin, yes, spot on. That's exactly what I wanted it to do :) –  Tiago Mar 12 at 18:17
1  
I added a possible solution for getting the main_address.populate_with. –  Justin Ko Mar 12 at 21:41

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