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Is it better (more pythonic, suggested, cleaner, standard, clearer, less error-prone...) to skip immediately to the next iteration when a necessary condition isn't met, or to put everything in an else block? (or logically equivalent block, for example put everything in a try block)

Take this for example:

for row in file
    fields = row.split()
    if !necessary_condition1(fields):
        print "Condition1 not satisfied"
        continue
    if !necessary_condition2(fields):
        print "Condition2 not satisfied"
        continue
    # ... there could be other conditions

    all_is_good_do_something()

And compare it to this logically equivalent code:

for row in file
    fields = row.split()
    if !necessary_condition1(fields):
        print "Condition1 not satisfied"
    else:
        if !necessary_condition2(fields):
            print "Condition2 not satisfied"
        else:
            # ... maybe other conditions
            all_is_good_do_something()

Which do you think is best? why? Is there a standard/convention on this?

share|improve this question
4  
This might be better suited for CodeReview. IMHO, continue is much more readable than that nested if-else mess. Alternatively, how about if necessary_condition1(fields) and necessary_condition2(fields)? – tobias_k Mar 12 '14 at 11:46
    
@tobias_k: it won't work if I need to discriminate between the two cases. In my example I just printed what condition isn't met, but there could be something more in there. – LeartS Mar 12 '14 at 11:49
    
the latter is definitely less readable – embert Mar 12 '14 at 11:50
1  
Personally, I like the first one most because you know at a glance that nothing else within the loop with be processed if conditions 1 or 2 are not satisfied. With the equivalent logical code you would need to scroll down to after the end of the else statements to tell whether anything more will happen (although if it is just a single function call as it appears to be in your example there may be very little difference). – ChrisProsser Mar 12 '14 at 11:56
    
You're right about CodeReview, I will ask the question with my actual code (which is not as simple as this one) there. – LeartS Mar 12 '14 at 12:15
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Option 1 is better, I don't think you will find any python programmer who prefers option 2 here. As an aside, try out import this in your python interpreter for an unofficial style guide for python and you may find option 2 violating numbers 1, 3, 7, and especially 5:

Flat is better than nested.

By the way, you can't use ! for negation in python, that would be a syntax error. Use not instead.

share|improve this answer
    
[Regarding !] Ops, overlooked that. Happens when you have to switch daily between python a C++. I agree that it looks better, but isn't this a way of jumping around similar to goto? And what if there are multiples lines of code in every "branch" of the "tree"? – LeartS Mar 12 '14 at 12:13
1  
An if statement is also a GOTO if you drill down deep enough. Does that mean you should avoid using if statements? continue is a perfectly valid keyword for flow control, if it violated the structured programming paradigm it would not be in the language at all. – wim Mar 12 '14 at 12:14
    
makes sense. I also didn't know about import this, nice. – LeartS Mar 12 '14 at 12:23

Consider the following flat version, somewhat similar to switch or case statement in other languages:

for row in file:
    fields = row.split()
    if !necessary_condition1(fields):
        print "Condition1 not satisfied"
    elif !necessary_condition2(fields):
        print "Condition2 not satisfied"
    else:
        # ... maybe other conditions
        all_is_good_do_something()

I don't know which one is more "pythonic" though.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is option 2 written in a sane way – wim Mar 12 '14 at 13:20
    
I actually have additional conditions in the else block, so this works for the example but not in the general case – LeartS Mar 12 '14 at 17:42
    
@LeartS: why so? You can use "elif <other conditions>:" instead of "else:" just the same. – Gassa Mar 12 '14 at 18:06
    
The actual code does something of the sort: if row is malformed, continue. If not get fields, do some manipulation, retrieve correspondent DB records, if # records == 0 continue, if > 1 do some error reporting If # records == 1: retrieve another set of records, and do something similar. Is this now obvious this should've been a codereview question – LeartS Mar 12 '14 at 19:46

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