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When I compile this simple word-wise XOR example, Clang 3.4 does not vectorise it. Why? It seems simpler than the examples in http://llvm.org/docs/Vectorizers.html#features and we do not have data-dependency between single words. So in theory, this can be vectorised.

#include <stdio.h>

void do_xor(const unsigned int num1[5], const unsigned int num2[5]) {
  unsigned int num3[5];

  // word-wise xor
  for (int i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
    num3[i] = num1[i] ^ num2[i];

  for (int i = 4; i >= 0; --i)
    printf("%08x", num3[i]);
  printf("\n");
}

using clang -O3 -fslp-vectorize-aggressive -emit-llvm ..... (forcing vectorisation) we end up with (stripped non-function parts):

define void @do_xor(i32* nocapture readonly %num1, i32* nocapture readonly %num2) #0 {
.preheader4:
  %0 = load i32* %num1, align 4, !tbaa !1
  %1 = load i32* %num2, align 4, !tbaa !1
  %2 = xor i32 %1, %0
  %3 = getelementptr inbounds i32* %num1, i64 1
  %4 = load i32* %3, align 4, !tbaa !1
  %5 = getelementptr inbounds i32* %num2, i64 1
  %6 = load i32* %5, align 4, !tbaa !1
  %7 = xor i32 %6, %4
  %8 = getelementptr inbounds i32* %num1, i64 2
  %9 = load i32* %8, align 4, !tbaa !1
  %10 = getelementptr inbounds i32* %num2, i64 2
  %11 = load i32* %10, align 4, !tbaa !1
  %12 = xor i32 %11, %9
  %13 = getelementptr inbounds i32* %num1, i64 3
  %14 = load i32* %13, align 4, !tbaa !1
  %15 = getelementptr inbounds i32* %num2, i64 3
  %16 = load i32* %15, align 4, !tbaa !1
  %17 = xor i32 %16, %14
  %18 = getelementptr inbounds i32* %num1, i64 4
  %19 = load i32* %18, align 4, !tbaa !1
  %20 = getelementptr inbounds i32* %num2, i64 4
  %21 = load i32* %20, align 4, !tbaa !1
  %22 = xor i32 %21, %19
  %23 = tail call i32 (i8*, ...)* @printf(i8* getelementptr inbounds ([5 x i8]* @.str, i64 0, i64 0), i32 %22) #2
  %24 = tail call i32 (i8*, ...)* @printf(i8* getelementptr inbounds ([5 x i8]* @.str, i64 0, i64 0), i32 %17) #2
  %25 = tail call i32 (i8*, ...)* @printf(i8* getelementptr inbounds ([5 x i8]* @.str, i64 0, i64 0), i32 %12) #2
  %26 = tail call i32 (i8*, ...)* @printf(i8* getelementptr inbounds ([5 x i8]* @.str, i64 0, i64 0), i32 %7) #2
  %27 = tail call i32 (i8*, ...)* @printf(i8* getelementptr inbounds ([5 x i8]* @.str, i64 0, i64 0), i32 %2) #2
  %putchar = tail call i32 @putchar(i32 10) #2
  ret void
}

No vector-code generated. Why?

share|improve this question
    
The flag doesn't 'force' anything, and there's no way a vectorized loop and its load / setup costs would be faster than 5 simple, fast bitwise XOR instructions that could be issued in parallel. Also, how would the 5th element be efficiently handled? –  Brett Hale Mar 12 '14 at 13:50
    
I think, the IR should contain vector-code. The machine-code-gen should decide if vectors are more efficient than single instructions and produce the according code. The 5th element can always be handled as single instruction -- that's no problem? –  cpt. jazz Mar 12 '14 at 15:00
    
you should make the parameters align to 16 bytes before it may vectorize the code –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Mar 15 '14 at 14:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I tried to successively increase the the size of the int-arrays (size of the loop) and it seems the vectorization kicks in if the big-ints are >= 14 words.

But I still don't see why there is this threshold in the front-end. I still think the front-end should always vectorise and the back-end should decide how to lower vectors, because it has the information about the target (eg. vectors supported at all, cost model for instructions, ...)

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