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i'm sorry to ask this question as i'm sure this has been asked before on here but i cant seem to find an SO question that clears this for me. If i'm coming from an RDBMS background, how can i easily model my data in a NoSQL fashion(Thinking in NoSQL). The terms used a lot in the NoSQL world seems to clash a lot with what we all know from RDBMS and this is where i think the heart of the confusion lies.

I have read a few documentation on couchdb and MongoDB and i kinda uderstand it theorethically, but when it comes to actually implementing what i have learnt, i really find myself still thinking in SQL and Relations

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Be careful that not all NoSQL solutions are document based. You have key-value databases, graph databases, column databases, document databases... –  joao Mar 12 '14 at 13:06

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up vote 2 down vote accepted
Table -> Collection
Row -> Document

More details here:

http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/reference/sql-comparison/

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This is correct. But keep in mind that a business object which would be spread out over multiple rows in multiple tables in a relational database is often concentrated into a single document in a document database. –  Philipp Mar 12 '14 at 13:22
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@Phillip is correct. While the data for a business object could be stored in multiple RDBMS tables, they could all be modeled/stored within a single collection in MongoDB. Hence, the non-availability of joins and transactions might not actually be an issue. There's a lot more to modeling data in NoSQL databases than can be explained here. Please refer MongoDB or other NoSQL database's documentation. –  Anand Jayabalan Mar 12 '14 at 13:34

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