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Some background - I'd written some code to call a WCF service and I was getting this error-

The communication object, System.ServiceModel.Channels.ServiceChannel, cannot be used for communication because it is in the Faulted state.

I could not figure out why it was in the faulted state in the first place, but I've added this piece of code as a fix. It's working right now, but is there any better way to do this? I mean, should this code be in my finally{} block, or anything else?

if (client != null && client.State == CommunicationState.Faulted)
{
    client.Abort();
}

This is the entire code which is inside a method-

TramsFileServiceClient client = null;
List<Guid> invoiceIds = new List<Guid>();
try
{
    //client = ServiceFactory.CreateTramsFileServiceClient(_handlerConfig.TramsFileServiceUrl);
    client = new TramsFileServiceClient();
    ProcessFileRQ request = new ProcessFileRQ();
    request.RunId = runId;
    request.ApplicationId = applicationId;
    ProcessFileRS response = client.ProcessFile(request);
    if (response == null || response.IsSuccessful == false)
        throw new FatalApplicationException(string.Format("Error occured while processing file. Run Id = {0}\n\nError Message = {1}", runId.ToString(), response != null ? response.ErrorMessage : string.Empty));
    else
    {
        foreach (Guid invoiceId in response.InvoiceIds)
        {
            invoiceIds.Add(invoiceId);
        }
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    if (client != null && client.State == CommunicationState.Faulted)
    {
        client.Abort();
    }
    throw new FatalApplicationException(string.Format("Error occured while processing file. Run Id = {0}\n\nError Message = {1}", runId.ToString(), ex.Message));
}
finally
{
    client.CloseClient();
}
return invoiceIds;
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Without having asked whether this code is correct, I tend to use this, which has been working fine so far in several projects:

try
{
    // Use client
}
catch (...)
{
    // Handle exceptions
}
finally
{
    if (client.State = CommunicationState.Faulted)
        client.Abort();
    else
        client.Close();
}
share|improve this answer
    
And even if the Catch throws an exception again like in my case, the finally{} block still executes, right? – karan k Mar 13 '14 at 3:02
    
That's how it's defined, yes ;-) – Thorsten Dittmar Mar 13 '14 at 8:31

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