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With the following code, I always get "VGA" as output ,when I intend to get "NOT VGA"

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
#define ADAPTER NVGA
#if ADAPTER==VGA
 int main()
 {
 printf("VGA");
 getch();
 return 0;
 }
#else
     int main()
 {
 printf(" NOT VGA");
 getch();
 return 0;
 }
 #endif
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1  
possible duplicate of how to compare string in C conditional preprocessor-directives –  Mauren Mar 12 '14 at 14:58
2  
@Mauren OP is not trying to compare strings in #if, but (most probably) identifiers not #defined to any value (so they evaluate to zero in #if). –  zwol Mar 12 '14 at 15:02
    
@Zack ah I see. I haven't realized. –  Mauren Mar 12 '14 at 16:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Question is, where are VGA and NVGA defined?

If they are not defined, they will equal 0 according to C standard (N1570 - 6.10.1 Conditional inclusion - paragraph 4):

After all replacements due to macro expansion and the defined unary operator have been performed, all remaining identifiers (including those lexically identical to keywords) are replaced with the pp-number 0, and then each preprocessing token is converted into a token.

Which means your comparison will be #if 0==0, which is identical to #if 1.

To fix this, you need to define both VGA and NVGA to have different values:

#define VGA  1
#define NVGA 2
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There are two possibilities, and I can't tell which. The most likely is that, because neither NVGA nor VGA is a #defined macro, they are both evaluated as zero in #if and therefore considered to be equal. (This is a rule of the language.) The second possibility is that your system's stdio.h or conio.h defines NVGA to VGA.

To find out which, compile this program and see what happens:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
/* these numbers are chosen at random */
#define NVGA 8446
#define VGA 13060
#define ADAPTER NVGA
int main(void)
{
#if ADAPTER == VGA
    puts("VGA");
#else
    puts("NOT VGA");
#endif
    getch();
    return 0;
}

If it produces the output you expected (i.e. "NOT VGA"), your problem is the first one. If you get an error about redefining NVGA or VGA, your problem is the second one.

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Thanks.It's the first one. –  user3411253 Mar 12 '14 at 15:49

Because NVGA itself hasn't been defined. Instead try this:

#define NVGA 0
#define VGA 1

#define ADAPTER VGA

#if ADAPTER==VGA
  /* insert VGA code here*/
#else
  /* insert NVGA code here*/
#endif
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