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Say I need some very special multiplication operator. It may be implemented in following macro:

macro @<<!(op1, op2)
{
    <[ ( $op1 * $op2 ) ]>
}

And I can use it like

def val = 2 <<! 3

And its work.

But what I really want is some 'english'-like operator for the DSL Im developing now:

macro @multiply(op1, op2)
{
    <[ ( $op1 * $op2 ) ]>
}

and if I try to use it like

def val = 2 multiply 3

compiler fails with 'expected ;' error

What is the problem? How can I implement this infix-format macro?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Straight from the compiler source code:

namespace Nemerle.English
{
  [assembly: Nemerle.Internal.OperatorAttribute ("Nemerle.English", "and", false, 160, 161)]
  [assembly: Nemerle.Internal.OperatorAttribute ("Nemerle.English", "or", false, 150, 151)]
  [assembly: Nemerle.Internal.OperatorAttribute ("Nemerle.English", "not", true, 181, 180)]  

  macro @and (e1, e2) {
    <[ $e1 && $e2 ]>
  }

  macro @or (e1, e2) {
    <[ $e1 || $e2 ]>
  }

  macro @not (e) {
    <[ ! $e ]>
  }

You need to sprinkle OperatorAttributes around and it will work. Btw, OperatorAttribute is defined as follows:

public class OperatorAttribute : NemerleAttribute
{
  public mutable env : string;
  public mutable name : string;
  public mutable IsUnary : bool;
  public mutable left : int;
  public mutable right : int;
}
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As usually, I found answer sooner than comunity respond :) So, solution is to simply use special assemply level attribute which specifies the macro as binary operator:

namespace TestMacroLib
{
  [assembly: Nemerle.Internal.OperatorAttribute ("TestMacroLib", "multiply", false, 160, 161)]
  public macro multiply(op1, op2)
  {
    <[ ( $op1 * $op2 ) ]>
  }
}
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Beat me by 11 seconds. Damn :) –  ADEpt Oct 21 '08 at 21:51
1  
That may also mean you should browse a little bit more before asking stuff. –  Luis Filipe Oct 29 '08 at 17:05
    
You may post your question to Google Groups too: groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/nemerle-en –  NN_ Mar 8 '11 at 8:46
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