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I find that the .NET event model is such that I'll often be raising an event on one thread and listening for it on another thread. I was wondering what the cleanest way to marshal an event from a background thread onto my UI thread is.

Based on the community suggestions, I've used this:

// earlier in the code
mCoolObject.CoolEvent+= 
           new CoolObjectEventHandler(mCoolObject_CoolEvent);
// then
private void mCoolObject_CoolEvent(object sender, CoolObjectEventArgs args)
{
    if (InvokeRequired)
    {
        CoolObjectEventHandler cb =
            new CoolObjectEventHandler(
                mCoolObject_CoolEvent);
        Invoke(cb, new object[] { sender, args });
        return;
    }
    // do the dirty work of my method here
}
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10 Answers 10

up vote 15 down vote accepted

A couple of observations:

  • Don't create simple delegates explicitly in code like that unless you're pre-2.0 so you could use:
   BeginInvoke(new EventHandler<CoolObjectEventArgs>(mCoolObject_CoolEvent), 
               sender, 
               args);
  • Also you don't need to create and populate the object array because the args parameter is a "params" type so you can just pass in the list.

  • I would probably favor Invoke over BeginInvoke as the latter will result in the code being called asynchronously which may or may not be what you're after but would make handling subsequent exceptions difficult to propagate without a call to EndInvoke. What would happen is that your app will end up getting a TargetInvocationException instead.

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I have some code for this online. It's much nicer than the other suggestions; definitely check it out.

Sample usage:

private void mCoolObject_CoolEvent(object sender, CoolObjectEventArgs args)
{
    // You could use "() =>" in place of "delegate"; it's a style choice.
    this.Invoke(delegate
    {
        // Do the dirty work of my method here.
    });
}
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1  
+1 for demonstrating non-LINQ usefullness of extension methods. –  galaktor Nov 11 '09 at 11:39
    
Excellent stuff. –  Joe Aug 13 '10 at 21:02

I shun redundant delegate declarations.

private void mCoolObject_CoolEvent(object sender, CoolObjectEventArgs args)
{
    if (InvokeRequired)
    {
        Invoke(new Action<object, CoolObjectEventArgs>(mCoolObject_CoolEvent, sender, args));
        return;
    }
    // do the dirty work of my method here
}

For non-events, you can use the System.Windows.Forms.MethodInvoker delegate or System.Action.

EDIT: Additionally, every event has a corresponding EventHandler delegate so there's no need at all to redeclare one.

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From my researching, I found that's the best way to do cross-thread calls.

What I like to do though is set up some generic events/handlers so I can re-use them and reduce code. For example, setting the text of a label is something I do a lot on cross thread calls, so I create a method/delegate for setting text for controls

delegate void SetTextCallback(Control ctrl, string text);

private void SetText(Control ctrl, string text)
{
    if (ctrl.InvokeRequired)
    {
        ctrl.BeginInvoke(new SetTextCallback(SetText), ctrl, text));
    }
    else
    {
        ctrl.Text = text;
    }
}

As for use, I just call SetText() and send in my control and the text I want for it. This lets me re-use my delegates fairly simply. I do the same thing for other cross thread actions setting color, visible, enabled, etc.

This is fairly specific to Windows forms though it can be applied to other situations if neccessary.

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I think the cleanest way is definitely to go the AOP route. Make a few aspects, add the necessary attributes, and you never have to check thread affinity again.

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I don't understand your suggestion. C# is not a natively aspect oriented language. Do you have in mind some pattern or library for implementing aspects that implements marshaling behind the scenes? –  Eric May 5 '09 at 18:08
    
I use PostSharp, so I define threading behavior in an attribute class and then use, say, [WpfThread] attribute in front of every method that has to be called on the UI thread. –  Dmitri Nesteruk May 6 '09 at 5:59
    
That's fascinating ... I will have to try it out. –  Eric May 6 '09 at 21:22

As an interesting side note, WPF's binding handles marshaling automatically so you can bind the UI to object properties that are modified on background threads without having to do anything special. This has proven to be a great timesaver for me.

In XAML:

<TextBox Text="{Binding Path=Name}"/>
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this wont work. once you set the prop on the non UI thread you get exception.. ie Name="gbc" bang! failure... there is no free cheese mate –  Boppity Bop Nov 23 '11 at 11:40
    
It's not free (it costs execution time), but the wpf binding machinery does appear to handle cross-thread marshalling automatically. We use this a lot with props that are updated by network data received on background threads. There's an explanaction here: blog.lab49.com/archives/1166 –  gbc Nov 27 '11 at 21:43

Nick,

Keep in mind that InvokeRequired might return false when an existing managed Control does not yet have an unmanaged handle. You ought to exercise caution in events that will be raised before control has been fully created.

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I made the following 'universal' cross thread call class for my own purpose, but I think it's worth to share it:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace CrossThreadCalls
{
  public static class clsCrossThreadCalls
  {
    private delegate void SetAnyPropertyCallBack(Control c, string Property, object Value);
    public static void SetAnyProperty(Control c, string Property, object Value)
    {
      if (c.GetType().GetProperty(Property) != null)
      {
        //The given property exists
        if (c.InvokeRequired)
        {
          SetAnyPropertyCallBack d = new SetAnyPropertyCallBack(SetAnyProperty);
          c.BeginInvoke(d, c, Property, Value);
        }
        else
        {
          c.GetType().GetProperty(Property).SetValue(c, Value, null);
        }
      }
    }

    private delegate void SetTextPropertyCallBack(Control c, string Value);
    public static void SetTextProperty(Control c, string Value)
    {
      if (c.InvokeRequired)
      {
        SetTextPropertyCallBack d = new SetTextPropertyCallBack(SetTextProperty);
        c.BeginInvoke(d, c, Value);
      }
      else
      {
        c.Text = Value;
      }
    }
  }

And you can simply use SetAnyProperty() from another thread:

CrossThreadCalls.clsCrossThreadCalls.SetAnyProperty(lb_Speed, "Text", KvaserCanReader.GetSpeed.ToString());

In this example the above KvaserCanReader class runs its own thread and makes a call to set the text property of the lb_Speed label on the main form.

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You can try to develop some sort of a generic component that accepts a SynchronizationContext as input and uses it to invoke the events.

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I've always wondered how costly it is to always assume that invoke is required...

private void OnCoolEvent(CoolObjectEventArgs e)
{
  BeginInvoke((o,e) => /*do work here*/,this, e);
}
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Performing a BeginInvoke within a GUI thread will cause the action in question to be deferred until the next time the UI thread processes Windows messages. This can actually be a useful thing to do in some cases. –  supercat Apr 17 '11 at 22:02

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