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I come from Java background and trying to understand C structures, pointers and arrays better. Here's the sample code that I am playing with:

If the following works:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    char string[] = "Hello";
    printf("%c",string[0]);
    return 0;
}

Why does the following return with an error?

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    typedef struct{
        int x;
        char string[8];
    }ST_DATA;

    ST_DATA *my_data;
    my_data->x = 100;
    my_data->string = "Hello"; // issues a warning, described below

    printf("%d",my_data->x); // works fine
    printf("%c",my_data->string[0]);
    return 0;
}

Following is the error that I am getting:

Compilation error time: 0 memory: 2292 signal:0

prog.c: In function ‘main’:

prog.c:12:18: error: incompatible types when assigning to type ‘char[8]’ from type ‘char *’

my_data->string = "Hello";

I tried with the following changes as well:

a)

my_data->string[] = "Hello";

This will give me the following error:

prog.c: In function ‘main’:

prog.c:12:18: error: expected expression before ‘]’ token

my_data->string[] = "Hello";

              ^

b)

my_data->string[8] = "Hello";

This returns with a runtime error. Presumably, the error occurs when I am printing the first character.

There must be something stupid that I am doing or expecting (being used to coding with other languages than C), but I can't seem to figure out why this is happening and how to get it to work. I'd greatly appreciate any pointers (ha! get it?)

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it should be strcpy(my_data->string,"Hello";) –  michaeltang Mar 12 '14 at 15:56
    
Understood. Thanks! Although, why does it work in the first code snippet then. I am essentially trying to do the same thing, only this time, the array is inside the structure. That is what is confusing me –  swap_1712 Mar 12 '14 at 16:01
    
@swap_1712 Check my answer below to clear your confusion. Hope you understand now. –  Sunil Bojanapally Mar 12 '14 at 16:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your first case, you are automatically allotting memory for char string[] = "Hello". The compiler takes care of memory management here.

In the second, my_data is a pointer and you need to allot memory to it manually, before you assign something to it.

You can:

ST_DATA *my_data = (ST_DATA *)malloc(sizeof(ST_DATA));

It'd be good you spend some time reading about automatic memory allocation and dynamic memory allocation.

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strcpy() need to be used to copy strings into string members of structure ST_DATA.

strcpy(my_data->string, "Hello");

Before you have to allocate memory for your structure as,

ST_DATA *my_data = (ST_DATA *) malloc(sizeof(ST_DATA));

EDIT: The structure ST_DATA inside main() is just a declaration which tells compiler that it has members of what type they are. How can you use it until it is allocated memory. You can think ST_DATA as a data type similar to any other data types as int etc which has no meaning when they are not defined as int object which gets memory for i.

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ST_DATA *my_data;
my_data->x = 100;

here my_data is a pointer so first allocate memory to it.

char string[] = "Hello";

here string is assigned value with declaration so it if fine. but in next code

my_data->string = "Hello";

is not ok since initialization can be done only with declaration. after declaration for string value has to be assigned using strcpy()

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Although, that part of the code seems to be working. I've been able to print the value of integer just fine. Just not the string. I added some more explanation as to what I have tried. Thanks again. –  swap_1712 Mar 12 '14 at 15:59

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