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I'm just starting out using the python mocking framework. I'd like to just count the number of times a method gets called, without removing the effects of actually calling the method.

For example, in this simple counter example, I would like to both increment the counter and track that it was called:

import unittest
import mock


class Counter(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.count = 0

    def increment(self):
        self.count += 1


class CounterTest(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_increment(self):
        c = Counter()
        c.increment()
        self.assertEquals(1, c.count)

    def test_call_count(self):

        with mock.patch.object(Counter, 'increment') as fake_increment:
            c = Counter()
            self.assertEquals(0, fake_increment.call_count)
            c.increment()
            self.assertEquals(1, fake_increment.call_count)

            # increment() didn't actually get called.
            self.assertEquals(1, c.count)  # Fails.

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

Is it possible to force mock to call the mocked method after it registered the call, or just signify that I want to keep the effects of the mocked function?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just use wraps:

c = Counter()
with mock.patch.object(Counter, 'increment', wraps=c.increment) as fake_increment:

There can be some binding problems if you initialize c later, as the function passed to wraps won't know about self.

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I'm not super experienced in mock1, but I accomplished it by using a function wrapper rather than the default MagicMock:

class FuncWrapper(object):
    def __init__(self, func):
        self.call_count = 0
        self.func = func

    def __call__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.call_count += 1
        return self.func(*args, **kwargs)

class CounterTest(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_call_count(self):

        c = Counter()
        new_call = FuncWrapper(c.increment)
        with mock.patch.object(c, 'increment', new=new_call) as fake_increment:
            print fake_increment
            self.assertEquals(0, fake_increment.call_count)
            c.increment()
            self.assertEquals(1, fake_increment.call_count)

            self.assertEquals(1, c.count)  # Fails.

Of course, this FuncWrapper is pretty minimal. It just counts the calls and then delegates flow control back to the original function. If you need to test other things at the same time, you'd need to add to the FuncWrapper class. I've also just patched a class instance rather than the entire class. The main reason for that is because I needed an instance method in FuncWrapper.

1In fact, I just started to learn -- Consider yourself warned ;-).

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