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The following uses a simple function pointer, but what if I want to store that function pointer? In that case, what would the variable declaration look like?

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

double operation(double (*functocall)(double), double wsum);
double get_unipolar(double);
double get_bipolar(double);

int main()
{
    double k = operation(get_bipolar, 2); // how to store get_bipolar?
    cout << k;
    return 0;
}
double operation(double (*functocall)(double), double wsum)
{
    double g = (*functocall)(wsum);
    return g;
}
double get_unipolar(double wsum)
{
    double threshold = 3;
    if (wsum > threshold)
        return threshold;
    else
        return threshold;
}
double get_bipolar(double wsum)
{
    double threshold = 4;
    if (wsum > threshold)
        return threshold;
    else
        return threshold;
}
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7 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You code is almost done already, you just seem to call it improperly, it should be simply

double operation(double (*functocall)(double), double wsum)
{
    double g;
    g = functocall(wsum);
    return g;
}

If you want to have a variable, it's declared in the same way

double (*functocall2)(double) = get_bipolar;

or when already declared

functocall2 = get_bipolar;

gives you a variable called functocall2 which is referencing get_bipolar, calling it by simply doing

functocall2(mydouble);

or passing it to operation by

operation(functocall2, wsum);
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yesssss that's what i wanted .. exactly i wanted to save the get_bipolar in a variable .. so i can use that variable again in some other place or even make an array of it –  Ismail Marmoush Feb 10 '10 at 10:09
    
i declared the functocall2 at the header file , how the assign would look like in a cpp file ???????????? –  Ismail Marmoush Feb 10 '10 at 10:40
    
Simply functocall2 = get_bipolar; just like any other assignment. –  MSalters Feb 10 '10 at 10:48
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You already (almost) have it in your code:

double (*functocall)(double) = &get_bipolar;

This defines a function pointer named functocall which points to get_bipolar.

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1  
shouldn't it be simply ... = get_bipolar; without the &? –  falstro Feb 10 '10 at 9:52
    
like this ?? double (*functocall)(double) = &get_bipolar; k=operation(???,2); // then what to put here ?? –  Ismail Marmoush Feb 10 '10 at 9:53
    
@roe - Using the & is definitely allowed and generally preferred by those in the "explicit is better than implicit" camp –  Manuel Feb 10 '10 at 9:54
1  
@Manuel: are you sure about that, it feels like functions are by their very definition pointers (to code) already. –  falstro Feb 10 '10 at 9:59
1  
@ismail - Maybe you should put angle brackets in those #includes ? –  Manuel Feb 10 '10 at 10:05
show 4 more comments
typedef double (*PtrFunc)(double); 

PtrFunc ptrBipolar = get_bipolar;


OR


typedef double (Func)(double); 

Func *ptrBipolar = get_bipolar;

which ever you are comfortable to use.

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Though when typedefing function types, I'd name them "Func" instead of "PtrFunc". –  Roger Pate Feb 15 '10 at 16:37
    
yes definately ,you are right. I am correcting it. –  Ashish Feb 16 '10 at 6:06
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typedef double (*func_t)(double); 
func_t to_be_used = get_bipolar
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Have a look at boost function, it's a header only library that tidies things up a little (IMHO): http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_42_0/doc/html/function.html

typedef boost::function<double (double)> func_t;
func_t to_be_used = &get_bipolar;

(NB: different syntax required for VC6)

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In the OP's case this will add some overhead to every call without any additional benefits –  Manuel Feb 10 '10 at 11:20
1  
There are advantages and disadvantages to boost function. The overhead is likely to be insignificant in the OP's use case, the additional benefit is in tidier code and greater extendibility. Seemed worth mentioning in a forum like this so readers can see what's available. –  Patrick Feb 10 '10 at 13:46
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double (*foo)(double);

where foo is the variable name.

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You should consider using a typedef:

 typedef double (*MyFunc)(double);
 MyFunc ptr_func = &get_bipolar;
 (*ptr_func)(0.0);


double operation(MyFunc functocall, double wsum)
{
    double g;
    g = (*functocall)(wsum);
    return g;
}

May I recommend also the identity template trick:

template<class T>
class Id
{
    typedef T type;
};

Id<double(double)>::type * ptr_func = &get_bipolar;
MyFunc func = &get_bipolar;
(*ptr_func)(0.0);


double operation(Id<double(double)>::type * functocall, double wsum)
{
    double g;
    g = (*functocall)(wsum);
    return g;
}
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