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I have a vector of size = N where each element i can have values from 0 to possible_values[i]-1. I want to do a function that iterates me through all those values.

I was able to do that in Python using a recursive generator:

def all_values(size,values,pos=0):
    if pos == size:
        yield []
    else:    
        for v in xrange(values[pos]):
            for v2 in all_values(size,values,pos+1):
                v2.insert(0,v)
                yield v2

possible_values=[3,2,2]
for v in all_values(3,possible_values):
    print v

Example output:

[0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 1]
[0, 1, 0]
[0, 1, 1]
[1, 0, 0]
[1, 0, 1]
[1, 1, 0]
[1, 1, 1]
[2, 0, 0]
[2, 0, 1]
[2, 1, 0]
[2, 1, 1]

Since C++ doesn't have the Python's yield I don't know what is the right way to implement this in C++.

Optional Question: Is there a better way to implement this in Python?

share|improve this question
    
C++ has return ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 12 '14 at 16:44
    
My attempt would be a functor with a constructor, where you define the posible_values and the size. Then you use the operator() to get the next element. –  tgmath Mar 12 '14 at 16:46
    
I still don't get the generation logic, could you give an example –  P0W Mar 12 '14 at 16:50
    
Can't you just use 3 loops? –  Petr Budnik Mar 12 '14 at 16:58
    
I would definitely advise you studying green threads and coroutines, understanding them will add a lot to your skillset especially if you find out where can you utilize them to make your code cleaner and better in case of C/C++. Check out some crossplatform coroutine implementations or if you would like to work with OS level apis then on windows search for the Fiber-API or on a unix systems search for the ucontext related apis (although it was removed from the posix standard many systems still provide it...). –  pasztorpisti Mar 12 '14 at 21:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This problem reminded me of some strange mixed-modulus arithmetic numbers.

I've put something together in Python. You should be able to reimplement this easily in C++. I sometimes used the input stream operator operator>>(...) in order to implement something like a generator in C++ (lazy evaluation is a really nice feature of Python's generators). Otherwise it'd be just an object that stores the state and let's you get the next value when you need it.

Here's some example code:

class Digit:
    def __init__(self, modulus):
        self.modulus = modulus
        self.value = 0
    def __str__(self):
        return str(self.value)
    def __nonzero__(self):
        return bool(self.value)
    def increment(self):
        self.value += 1
        self.value %= self.modulus
        return self.value == 0

class Number:
    def __init__(self, moduli):
        self.digits = [Digit(m) for m in moduli]
    def __str__(self):
        return "".join(str(d) for d in self.digits)
    def __nonzero__(self):
        return any(d for d in self.digits)
    def increment(self):
        carryover = True
        for d in reversed(self.digits):
            if carryover:
                carryover = d.increment()

n = Number([3,2,2])
while True:
    print n
    n.increment()
    if not n:
        break

Here's the output:

000
001
010
011
100
101
110
111
200
201
210
211

Some links for further reference:

share|improve this answer

Generators in C++ aren't trivial but still possible with a bit of black magic:

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/29524/Generators-in-C

You can look at answers to Safe cross platform coroutines because attempts to actually emulate python "yield" (including PEP 342) will bring you to some coroutine implementation anyway.

If you want to solve your problem in C++ way, it's more common to use an object for storing state of your "non-generator" method.

share|improve this answer
    
Agree about the coroutines and instead of adding my own answer I would attach some advices for OP here as it is relevant to your answer. In the past I've given up understanding coroutines many times until finding out from a tutorial that coroutines are basically green threads / fibers (it has many names). Try to learn about green threads as it is basically the system level implementation of coroutines, for me interpreting a green thread implementation was much easier than understanding a high-level coroutine tutor. The (shallow) python generators are just coroutines with several restrictions. –  pasztorpisti Mar 12 '14 at 21:00

Yet another:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

typedef std::vector<unsigned int> uint_vector;
typedef std::vector<uint_vector> values_vector;

values_vector all_values (const uint_vector & ranges, unsigned int pos=0) {
   values_vector result;
   if (pos == ranges.size()) {
      result.push_back (uint_vector());
   }   
   else {
      values_vector rem_result = all_values (ranges, pos+1);
      for (unsigned int v = 0; v < ranges[pos]; ++v) {
         for (auto it : rem_result) {
            result.push_back (uint_vector(1,v));
            result.back().insert (result.back().end(), it.begin(), it.end());
         }
      }      
   }      
   return result;
}      

void print_values (const values_vector & combos) {
   for (auto combo : combos) {
      std::cout << "[ "; 
      for (auto num : combo) {
         std::cout << num << ' ';
      }      
      std::cout << "]\n";
   }      
}      

int main () {
   uint_vector ranges {3,2,2};
   print_values (all_values (ranges));
   return 0;
}      

Implementation at ideone.com

share|improve this answer

EDIT: A bit more concise general code with better comments and explanation (I hope ;)).

This is an iterative, not a recursive, approach for an arbitrary number of positions with arbitrary maximum possible values. The idea is as follows.

We are given maximum possible value in each position. For each position we generate an array containing of all possible values for this position. We find total number of combinations of how these values can be picked out to fill in positions ("number of permutations", equal to product of all possible values). We then iterate through all combinations, storing each current combination in an array of combinations, and updating current indices to select next combination on the next iteration. We don't need to worry about boundary checks, because we are inherently limited by number of combinations. After iterated through all combinations, we return a 2D array that holds all of them (and then print them).

Hope it might be useful (code on ideone.com):

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

namespace so {
using size = std::size_t;
using array_1d = std::vector<size>;
using array_2d = std::vector<array_1d>;

array_2d generate_combinations_all(array_1d const & _values_max) {
 array_2d values_all_; // arrays of all possible values for each position
 size count_combination_{1}; // number of possible combinations

 for (auto i_ : _values_max) { // generate & fill in 'values_all_'
  array_1d values_current_(i_);
  size value_current_{0};

  std::generate(values_current_.begin(), values_current_.end(), [&] {return (value_current_++);});
  values_all_.push_back(std::move(values_current_));
  count_combination_ *= i_;
 }

 array_2d combinations_all_; // array of arrays of all possible combinations
 array_1d indices_(_values_max.size(), 0); // array of current indices

 for (size i_{0}; i_ < count_combination_; ++i_) {
  array_1d combinantion_current_; // current combination

  for (size j_{0}; j_ < indices_.size(); ++j_) // fill in current combination
   combinantion_current_.push_back(values_all_[j_][indices_[j_]]);

  combinations_all_.push_back(std::move(combinantion_current_)); // append to 'combinations_all_'

  for (size m_{indices_.size()}; m_-- > 0;) // update current indices
   if (indices_[m_] < _values_max[m_] - 1) { // ++index at highest position possible
    ++indices_[m_];
    break;
   }
   else indices_[m_] = 0; // reset index if it's alrady at max value
 }

 return (combinations_all_);
}

void print_combinations_all(array_2d const & _combinations_all) {
 for (auto const & i_ : _combinations_all) { // "fancy" printing
  std::cout << "[";
  for (size j_{0}; j_ < i_.size(); ++j_)
   std::cout << i_[j_] << ((j_ < i_.size() - 1) ? ", " : "]\n");
 }
}
} // namespace so

int main() {
 so::array_1d values_max_a_{3, 2, 2};
 so::array_1d values_max_b_{2, 1, 3, 2};

 so::print_combinations_all(so::generate_combinations_all(values_max_a_));
 std::cout << "***************" << std::endl;
 so::print_combinations_all(so::generate_combinations_all(values_max_b_));

 return (0);
}

Program's output:

[0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 1]
[0, 1, 0]
[0, 1, 1]
[1, 0, 0]
[1, 0, 1]
[1, 1, 0]
[1, 1, 1]
[2, 0, 0]
[2, 0, 1]
[2, 1, 0]
[2, 1, 1]
***************
[0, 0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 0, 1]
[0, 0, 1, 0]
[0, 0, 1, 1]
[0, 0, 2, 0]
[0, 0, 2, 1]
[1, 0, 0, 0]
[1, 0, 0, 1]
[1, 0, 1, 0]
[1, 0, 1, 1]
[1, 0, 2, 0]
[1, 0, 2, 1]
share|improve this answer

Another implementation.

PS: The printing of the values can be customized to look like the output from Python but I didn't think that was necessary to illustrate the algorithm to generate the output data.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

void print_values(vector<vector<int> > const& values)
{
   for ( auto v1 : values)
   {
      for ( auto v : v1 )
      {
         cout << v << " ";
      }
      cout << "\n";
   }
}

vector<vector<int> > get_all_values(int size,
                                    vector<int>::const_iterator iter)
{
   vector<vector<int> > ret;
   if ( size == 1 )
   {
      for (int v = 0; v != *iter; ++v )
      {
         std::vector<int> a = {v};
         ret.push_back(a);
      }
      return ret;
   }

   vector<vector<int> > prev = get_all_values(size-1, iter+1);
   for (int v = 0; v != *iter; ++v )
   {
      for ( vector<int>& v1 : prev )
      {
         std::vector<int> a = {v};
         a.insert(a.end(), v1.begin(), v1.end());
         ret.push_back(a);
      }
   }

   return ret;
}

vector<vector<int> > get_all_values(vector<int> const& in)
{
   return get_all_values(in.size(), in.begin());
}

int main()
{
   vector<int> a{2};
   vector<int> b{2,3};
   vector<int> c{2,3,2};

   cout << "----------\n";
   print_values(get_all_values(a));
   cout << "----------\n";
   print_values(get_all_values(b));
   cout << "----------\n";
   print_values(get_all_values(c));
   cout << "----------\n";

   return 0;
}

The output generated from running the program:

----------
0
1
----------
0 0
0 1
0 2
1 0
1 1
1 2
----------
0 0 0
0 0 1
0 1 0 
0 1 1
0 2 0
0 2 1
1 0 0
1 0 1
1 1 0
1 1 1
1 2 0
1 2 1
----------
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