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From the agile manifesto, agile values:

Individuals and interactions over processes and tools,

Working software over comprehensive documentation,

Customer collaboration over contract negotiation,

Responding to change over following a plan

Yet doesn't TDD create a plan and almost structure out a contract negotiation?

"What are the features you want?" "1,2,3" Developer writes tests for 1,2,3 -> Team delivers code "Here's 1,2,3 give us our money"

It's also a form of comprehensive documentation and also a process. Once the tests are written individuals and interactions no longer matter as much because the "source of truth" is no longer with people but ironed out in the code.

Just wondering how they fit together, if they're opposed or do they work together?

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This seems to be just playing with words. –  Mike Stockdale Mar 12 at 17:36
    
There isn't really a way to solve or prove this. It may not be a good fit for SO, IMO. –  Ryan Gates Mar 12 at 17:38
    
Well, an answer like: "Even though the agile manifesto seems to go against TDD, that's only a shallow interpretation. In reality, they work together because.." OR "They are completely unrelated' OR "They should never be used together" –  user2483724 Mar 12 at 18:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

TDD is more like a practice for individual contributors, instead of a process. Test here usually refers to unit test, which is part of development work, instead of comprehensive test suits such as performance, functional, and integration tests.

TDD in certain cases should help individual contributor really think about requirement and implementation (respond to change and come up with working software). I personally do not adopt this practice, but it is an agile practice that can be adopted by a single contributor. Do not confuse it with higher level tests and related documents.

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Ok, that's helpful, it's more of a contract between developers. Any insight as to why some people seem to be getting mad at the question? –  user2483724 Mar 12 at 17:33
    
TDD is a practice highly dependent on personality. Some people love to write every item down on a list before go shopping, and cross them out one by one in the process. While others just try to remember things and grab on site. It's hard to justify the trade offs, and that's highly dependent on the scope of a task (usually flexible too). It's kinda comparable to pair programming, while some feel so nice to have accompany, and others feel better to keep some private thinking space. –  miushock Mar 12 at 18:27

Yet doesn't TDD create a plan

Nope. TDD does not mean "write tests up front" it means "write tests before writing code". The whole "Do as much as you need and no more" comes into play. You are not expected to write the tests for all your features before writing any code, just the feature you are currently on. And then (depending on the level of testing) just a small subset of the feature will need tests now.

It's also a form of comprehensive documentation and also a process

It also aids with working software.

Working software over comprehensive documentation,

Over, not instead of. If you can get both, great.

the tests are written individuals and interactions no longer matter as much because the "source of truth" is no longer with people but ironed out in the code.

The oracle for what it does is always the code. The oracle for what it should do is always people. TDD done well also aids with the communication.

Any insight as to why some people seem to be getting mad at the question?

The question comes off as very troll-y. You are twisting the manifesto to make it sound like anything that aids the latter is "bad" and you are twisting the definition of TDD to be an all-encompassing, completely up-front process. Neither of which are true.

Individuals and interactions over processes and tools,

BDD is a great tool for aiding interactions at a dev/BA/stake holder level. TDD (xUnit and alikes) are great tools for aiding interactions at a dev level.

Working software over comprehensive documentation

TDD helps create working software.

Customer collaboration over contract negotiation

(BDD) Being able to describe in a common language the specification and have that execute is awesome.

Responding to change over following a plan

A well tested code base can change with ease. An untested or badly tested code base is fixed.

That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.

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Thanks for the breakdown! It's been a while since I asked the question but I've since learned that "testing" is actually quite a broad concept and that it people often get into semi-religious arguments over it on what is the "right way". IMO now, testing and agile are actually separate ideas that came about around the same time but are connected. Agile required fast deployment and release for feedback and testing allowed these releases to happen consistently without hiccup. Testing existed prior to agile but it wasn't used for the purpose of such rapid deployment before. –  user2483724 Mar 31 at 16:30
    
Keep in mind that (big A) Agile is just a bunch of stuff people were already doing written down. Then made by some into a religion. –  mlk Apr 8 at 16:28

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