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I'd like to make my own crypto currency. I don't want to just recompile the Bitcoin source code and the rename it. I'd like to do it from scratch just to learn more about it. I'm thinking of using Python as the language for the implementation but I heard that in terms of performance Python isn't the best. My question is, would a network written in Python be able to perform well under the possibility of millions of peers (I know it's not going to happen but I'd like to make my network scalable.)

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Cool, good luck with that! – Zach Spencer Mar 12 '14 at 18:06
    
Beware, Satoshi Nakamoto is doing the rounds. – gravetii Mar 12 '14 at 18:08
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Depends which part is in Python. The network is, by definition, I/O bound. It's unlikely that using Python rather than C/C++/etc. will cause a noticeable performance drop for the client itself. Your choice of cryptographic algorithm will also have a large impact on performance (how quick it is to verify transactions, etc.).

Now, as for 'mining' the currency, it would be silly to do that with Python since that's very much a CPU-bound task. In fact, using a GPU which allows for massive parallelism on trivially parallel problems is a much better idea (CUDA or OpenCL work great here).

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GPUs? Come on. If you're not fabricating your own ASICs you obviously aren't serious about performance. – Jean-Paul Calderone Mar 12 '14 at 22:27

Nothing beats good ol' C for performance. However, if you plan on parallelising everything for multi-CPU support I would give Haskell a try. It is inherently parallel, so you won't have to put in extra effort for optimizations.

You can also do something similar in C with OpenMP and Cilk using pragmas.

Good Luck!

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