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Lets say I have a tuple like below:

s = 15, 50, 71, 4, 19

And I am trying to add each element in the tuple one by one with each other element. i.e. find the sum of 15 and 50 and 15 and 71, etc...

So I have tried to mess around with the map function but I have never used it but I have come up with this but I am getting the TypeError: argument 2 to map() must support iteration error.

test1 = tuple(map(operator.add, s[0], s[1]))

I have also tried to make each element an integer but I also get an error

test1 = tuple(map(operator.add, int(s[0]), int(s[1])))

I was hoping someone knows of another method where I can accomplish what I am trying to do.

Thank you!!

EDIT:

Thanks everyone, all the suggestions were helpful and I found a few different ways to do what I needed to be done!

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1  
What do you expect the output to be for your example? –  interjay Mar 12 '14 at 18:36
    
and do you care if there are repeats? –  Corley Brigman Mar 12 '14 at 18:50
    
For the end result, lets say that I am looking for 2 of the numbers to equal the sum of 65 so I am trying to find which combinations of two numbers will equal that number –  Shmoe Mar 12 '14 at 20:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think perhaps you are looking for itertools.combinations and itertools.starmap:

In [7]: s = 15, 50, 71, 4, 19

In [8]: import itertools as IT

In [9]: import operator

In [10]: list(IT.starmap(operator.add, (IT.combinations(s, 2))))
Out[10]: [65, 86, 19, 34, 121, 54, 69, 75, 90, 23]

IT.combinations(s, 2) returns an iterator with all the pairs of items from s:

In [11]: list(IT.combinations(s, 2))
Out[11]: 
[(15, 50),
 (15, 71),
 (15, 4),
 (15, 19),
 (50, 71),
 (50, 4),
 (50, 19),
 (71, 4),
 (71, 19),
 (4, 19)]

IT.starmap applies operator.add to each pair. You use starmap instead of map when you want the arguments to be unpacked. operator.add expects 2 arguments, while the pair is just a single object -- a 2-tuple. So we use starmap to unpack the 2-tuple into 2 arguments before passing them along to operator.add.

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Thank you, this what I was looking for! –  Shmoe Mar 12 '14 at 20:55

It seems simplest to just use sum...

(starmap(operator.add ...) is the same thing as map(sum ...))

tuple(map(sum, itertools.combinations(s, 2)))
Out[9]: (65, 86, 19, 34, 121, 54, 69, 75, 90, 23)
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In case you don't want to use combinations() -

s = 15, 50, 71, 4, 19
l = len(s)
print [s[i] + s[j] for i in xrange(l - 1) for j in xrange(i + 1, l)]

# [65, 86, 19, 34, 121, 54, 69, 75, 90, 23]
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I usually use list comprehensions instead of map... which one you prefer seems to be stylistic. That method is like this:

 tuple(x+y for x,y in combinations(s, 2))

It's also somewhat faster than map, though I'm not 100% sure why.

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This is the grossest thing I have ever made. No need to import anything though

>>> s = 15, 50, 71, 4, 19
>>> s
(15, 50, 71, 4, 19)
>>> x = [a + s[i-1] for a in s[i:] for i in range(1,len(s)) for a in s[i:]]
>>> x
[65, 86, 19, 34, 121, 54, 69, 75, 90, 23]
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