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I'm thinking about storing list of passwords for users (eventually more info about them) of small-scale (max. 20 users) app in PHP file in directory like public_html_root/system/config/

<?php if($calledByApp !== true) die();
  $pwds['username1'] = 'hispassword';
  $pwds['username2'] = 'herpassword';
  $pwds['username3'] = 'anotheroned';
?>

Now. hispassword is actually hashed version

$hashedpasword = sha1($password.sha1($salt));

This way, if file is included, it checks for $calledByApp, which is set upon starting from entry point - i.e. index.php in root, so we could say it's safe this way. If it's called directly from browser - it won't get served as text file, but rather as PHP file - and it will die also, since $calledByApp will return null or false.

Also, if another user is stored/deleted, the file gets rebuilt, so it reflects all users. And after including this file, we have all users in pretty array, so if we call

if (is_string($pwds[$sanitized_username]) 
&& ($pwds[$sanitized_username] === $sanitized_sha1_userpassword))

we'll do login.

My question is: Is this safe enough?

Clarification: DB for users seems to be a bit overkill - another table for max 20 users. Also, while this doesn't check if user is real, it won't do anything with DB - looks like added security too.

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BTW: Consider using the new PHP 5.5 methods password_hash and password_verify. These functions provide a secure way to hash your passwords - they even add the salt for you! For your problem: I would use a database anyway in order to seperate your code from the data. –  andreas Dec 25 '13 at 22:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No - this is a really bad idea.

By making your souce code files writeable you open a whole avenue for attacking your system. Embedding data into source code is a messy practice - not least because it will not scale. What happens if the file is locked for an update when a script tries to include it? What happens when the connection to the browser is lost part way through writing the file?

If you're quite sure that you'll only ever have a very small number of users and a low level of concurrency then abetter solution by far would be to have a seperate directory, with all http access denied, containing one file per user, named with the username (or a hash of it if you prefer) containing the hashed password.

C.

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If for some reason mod_php has a hiccup it could result in httpd showing the uninterpreted file; store the script outside of the document root in order to fix this.

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Well, of course it won't be in root (e.g.myapp.com/admin), more like i wrote up there (edited v.) –  Adam Kiss Feb 10 '10 at 11:32

I would rather place that file outside of document root instead of relying on the PHP interpreter not failing for any reason.

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Well, of course it won't be in root (e.g.myapp.com/admin), more like i wrote up there (edited v.) –  Adam Kiss Feb 10 '10 at 11:31
3  
I mean completely outside of the tree accessible from the web browser, not in a subdir of your root. –  Matteo Riva Feb 10 '10 at 11:33

It's always safer to store the encrypted passwords in a database.

If you are using a database then I would store user data in there. If not then I would look to start using one.

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Yeah, well, I should clarify, that it seems to be a bit overkill - another table for max 20 users. Also, while this doesn't check if user is real, it won't do anything with DB - looks like added security too. –  Adam Kiss Feb 10 '10 at 11:27
1  
@Adam you could use sqlite. It's pretty lightweight. –  Gordon Feb 10 '10 at 11:51
    
@Gordon - am I not screwed if no SQLite on server? –  Adam Kiss Feb 10 '10 at 11:55
    
@Adam well, yes, you cannot use it then. But it's not like you have to use it anyway. I just wanted to suggest one that you wouldn't have to be concerned about being overkill, since it's a flatfile anyway. –  Gordon Feb 10 '10 at 12:07
    
@Gordon, yes, good suggestion. I'm just taking all possibilities to account :] And situation is, that I met with pretty strange and f*cked up hostings nowadays... –  Adam Kiss Feb 10 '10 at 12:45

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