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Apart from allowing you insert js variables into a script tag when written like document.write('<scr' + 'ipt src= what are the pros/cons of this vs a normal <script src=> tag?

I'm mainly asking with regard to speed but interested in the whole story.

Thanks Denis

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I don't see any question –  Andreas Bonini Feb 10 '10 at 11:24
    
Stackoverflow does this: document.write('<s'+'cript lang' + 'uage="jav' + 'ascript" src="http://ads.stackoverflow.com/a.aspx? –  Skilldrick Feb 10 '10 at 11:31
    
Does this question help? stackoverflow.com/questions/236073/… –  Paul D. Waite Feb 10 '10 at 11:36
    
@Paul. not really as I get why we split it. What I'm wondering is if I have a choice to split it and use a js variable or not split it and use a serverside variable, apart from reduced code bloat do I get anything inway of a speed increase or otherwise by going the server option? –  Denis Hoctor Feb 10 '10 at 11:51
    
Ah, okay, gotcha. –  Paul D. Waite Feb 10 '10 at 12:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I assume this is to gain non blocking javascript loading.

For this i suggest looking at Steve Souders posts about the subject. http://www.stevesouders.com/blog/2009/04/27/loading-scripts-without-blocking/

The LABjs library solves this in a pretty nifty way. http://labjs.com/

Also it seems newer browsers are beginning to load things parallel by default http://www.stevesouders.com/blog/2010/02/07/browser-script-loading-roundup/

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There is no need for '<scr'+'ipt'. There is need for '<\/scr'+'ipt>'. Because HTML interpreter has no need to understand Javascript, so it will treat everything between <script>...</script> as the text, and won't care var a='</script>'; is a string literal Javascript, it will consider it the closing tag for <script> and regard the remainder of the script text as plain (erroneous) HTML.

edit: corrected per David's suggestion

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And that's wrong too. It should be: "<\/script>" since HTML parsers (at least ones which implement HTML correctly, i.e. not most web browsers) will treat </ as an end tag. –  Quentin Feb 10 '10 at 11:40
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"<\/script>" not "<\/scr" + "ipt>". The latter is pointless, inefficient, hard to read bloat. –  Quentin Feb 10 '10 at 11:53

Other than those? There aren't any.

(Incidentally, splitting a script tag in a JS string into a pair of concatenated strings is pointless bloat)

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